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Sharing some learning – a few observations from “D11”

with 10 comments

d11-20130528-144203-01167-MThis past week the 11th All Things D Conference, D11, was held.  It is such a great opportunity to attend and to learn from a great combination of interviews, speakers, demonstrations, questions, and attendees.  Attending this conference has been a very valuable learning experience for me over the years and I’ve always made it a point to reflect and share some observations or learnings that stuck with me.  This year is no different.

As with all events these days, so much of what happens at the event is tweeted, live blogged, re-blogged, etc.  That makes it challenging to offer more by way of learning. If you’re interested in the details of the sessions, by all means watch the videos or see the official coverage on the All Things D, D11 Conference site.  All the interviews are done by one or both of Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher.  There you’ll also find some behind the scenes “KatieCam” videos shot by WSJ writer Katherine Boehret in a more relaxed setting as speakers left the stage and other behind the scenes videos and articles by teh ATD writing team. Definitely check out the amazing photos from Asa Mathat (and team) that really capture the unique qualities of the conference.

“The Dialog”

For me what separates D from other events, if you had to pick one thing, is the dialog that takes place.  While the format is an interview, I see it as more of a dialog.  There are no slides, no setup, and after the interview the dialog continues with audience questions and then even more in the hallways during breaks (not to mention the electronic dialog).  I feel sometimes in an effort to report the event as news, the back and forth or the dialog itself can get a bit de-prioritized.

The dialog is important because the timing of the conference is the same every year.  That means not every speaker has something to announce or launch.  In fact some speakers have announcements already scheduled for the future and even with a lot of pushing they still aren’t going to preempt their organization’s efforts.  This means that speakers sign up to attend knowing there are definitely questions they will get that must go unanswered.  I think that speaks volumes to the appreciation for the dialog and participation that speakers share.

Still, that can be a tiny bit frustrating for folks reading about the accounts—you are hoping for news but don’t get any.  There is a slightly different tone “in the room” which I am hoping to convey through these notes.  The tone is very much about the nuance and subtlety of the topics being raised.  So even if there is not news, the conversation is interesting.  It is an important part of innovation and convergence of industries (the original and ongoing theme of the conference was how media, entertainment, and digital technologies are coming together).  There are gems in most every session if you watch the video—not necessarily news gems, but articulation of challenges and tradeoffs that everyone is facing as they do their work.  Making products is never a stark either/or set of choices and capturing these tradeoffs on stage, in the “hot seat” as it is called, is something I appreciate very much.

Big picture

There were 25 speakers along with demo sessions.  The breadth of topics discussed delivers on the promise of the conference.  Through the lens of product development there were a number of “themes” that surfaced for me:

  • Mobile “era” – No one doubts the era we are in as an industry and across industries.  The tech folks were “mobile first” from apps to advertising, not as a place to port to or also support.  The entertainment folks see mobile as a place to enjoy entertainment or as the screen that accompanies entertainment, not as a competitor to television.  Even attendees were mostly seen on their mobile devices most of the time.  While this might not seem newsworthy, observing the changing perspectives over the years of the conference provides a neat context for this change.
  • Disruption – Most tech conferences are about disruption in some form or another.  This conference came about during a time when disruption was really happening (and to be fair, the WSJ and ATD are/were both part of disruptive dialogs over the years—and the topic of conversation at the show).  The interviews always do a good job of confronting speakers who are viewed as participants in a potential disruption.
  • Sensors – The role of sensors as part of the baseline experience for computing is front and center.  There was a lot of discussion around form factors, wearables, and scenarios but all of this is rooted in devices that know about surroundings, which means products can be designed knowing the computers will have these capabilities.
  • Consumerization – Walt Mossberg has always taken the non-techie, consumer approach to looking at technology which, as he said during the show, was somewhat heretical when he first started his column.  These days the notion of consumers driving the experience and setting the bar does not seem so far-fetched.   You know that is the case when the CEO of Cisco says “bring your own device trumps security”.
  • Embrace of digital – In past years the “content” attendees appeared more on the defense than the offense.  While the business challenges remain in some parts of the content space, I think there is far more of a sense of embrace and partnering going on between the tech and content parties.  In general it felt to me like much more of a healthy dialog rooted in respect than in past years, which is a positive evolution.

Sessions

As mentioned, the sessions are all available on the D11 site along with live blogs done by WSJ/ATD reporters.  Check those out for sure.  I just wanted to offer some additional observations from a small set of sessions that hit close to home from a product development perspective.  Inclusion / omission or number of points below are not indications of quality or importance!

Apple / Tim Cook

  • Measuring what counts – There was a strong focus on measuring usage as a way of looking at success.  This contrasted with the recent debate about market share (units or revenue).  The depth usage of iOS devices is significantly more than competing devices.  It is super interesting to think about how to inform product development when balancing existing depth usage, new users, and growth – very interesting.
  • Relative to Android – The dialog turned to defining “winning” along the lines of usage, customer satisfaction, and even the amount of commerce done on iOS devices.
  • Magic – There was a good discussion about how working across the team needs to focus on the intersection of hardware/software/services as being where the “magic happens”.  Everyone in the product space knows that wherever seams exist there is an opportunity to innovate or for there to be challenges–seams can be found all over the place, especially as a product gets larger or an ecosystem around the product develops.
  • Tradeoffs – As an example of the nuance/subtlety that is hard to capture, Cook tried to walk through some of the tradeoffs that go into making different sized devices for different “segments” (Walt’s description).  He talked about color correctness, white balance, battery life, brightness, and more.  A favorite expression from Cook was “customers expect Apple to weigh all these factors and decide things” along with the humble notion that deciding means shipping and learning.  I personally love when the dialog turns to these types of issues at this “level” in an organization and also externally—real engineering stuff that is worth talking about in an open way.
  • Openness and control – In talking about the difference between iOS and Android (using keyboards as an example), Cook was asked about opening up more.  He talked about the challenges and tradeoffs involved in “putting the customer at risk” with some times of APIs and openness but committed to more openness at the upcoming WWDC.  Again there was a very interesting and subtle discussion about the tradeoffs involved.

Facebook / Sheryl Sandberg

  • Mobile is good for Facebook – There were a lot of numbers and support for how much engagement there is from both users and advertisers on mobile.
  • Increasing engagement – Sandberg shared some numbers that were counter-intuitive for many (as evidenced by the reaction in the section I was sitting) when she talked about the increase in engagement.  Five years ago 50% of people visited every day.  Now 58% visit every day and the number of users is much higher.
  • Priorities – I loved when she talked about how they have 5000 people to build and operate a service for a billion people.  That puts the product development challenge in perspective.
  • Mobile first – There is a strong “pivot” in the development team around mobile first.  Whereas the browser used to be the primary target and the mobile teams would be playing catch-up, now nothing gets done without it being mobile first.
  • Facebook Home – The challenges of doing an offering that is polarizing for sure.  She cited that customer reviews are either 1 star or 5 stars.  Home is a V1 and expect to deliver on the commitment to frequent changes/updates.

Disney Parks and Resorts / Tom Staggs

  • My Magic Plus – This session was about a new way to enjoy a WDW (Walt Disney World) theme park visit—essentially you wear a “magic band” around your wrist (like a Jawbone Up or Fitbit).  As someone who grew up in Orlando watching WDW go from the Magic Kingdom surrounded by orange groves to what it is today, I think the revolution that is going on with this innovation is amazing and far-reaching.
  • Features – Wearing the band provides an experience with reduced anxiety, less waiting, more fun, and far more personal.  And it is just starting.  An amazing example I loved was how you could order the food you want and when you get to the restaurant you sit down and what you ordered just shows up.  Neat.  But what is really neat is that the employees can focus on being “hosts” and not the transactional elements of ordering and getting things right.  Super cool.  It certainly makes that summer job at Disney a lot more fun!
  • Senses and sensors – Of course this is all about location aware, cloud experienced.  But the way Staggs described it was “360-5” as a 360 degree experience for all 5 senses—you’re immersed in the experience beyond the rides.  In general, this was a demonstration that unfolded super well—as I thought of questions they got answered moments later.  So much opportunity on this platform.

Twitter / Dick Costolo

  • “Social soundtrack” – Twitter was described as the second screen for television.  It is viewed as a complement to broadcast.  This was a statement that gets broadened to mean that Twitter is not itself thinking about making content or distributing it.
  • Global town square – The way they think of Twitter is to think about both planned/unplanned events and to provide an unfiltered/inside out platform for the people “the event is happening to”.  This town square is public, real-time, conversational, and distributed.  From a product point of view, the clarity of this framework is incredibly valuable.
  • Advertising – Costolo discussed how advertisers are coming to understand that being part of the conversation is important and how the idea of having a conversation as the canvas versus the ad itself as the canvas is important.
  • Design – Another subtle part of the dialog was around where the openness of the Twitter platform will be.  The idea is that Twitter does want to own the timeline experience for customers but still be open to thousands (100s of thousands) of developers with fairly lightweight rules.  Simplicity is a major focus on the design of the timeline experience.

Glow / Max Levchin

  • Demonstration – this was a demonstration of a new product that brings data and mobility to the challenges of procreation and fertility.
  • App – The app is focused on being a beautiful source of telemetry and information for both the man and woman planning together to conceive a child.
  • Data – Turns out that there is tons of data which is hard for people to get hold of and include in their planning and efforts.  Glow is a way to bring this data to the solution space for people.
  • Funding – The data shows that with the right use of data “infertility” can drop way down and thus the overall cost to the healthcare system is much lower.  To support this the way the product will work is essentially to create a pool for people who are still unable to conceive after using the tool, which is a much smaller number than would be using less data-informed tools.
  • Innovation – This is truly innovative when it comes to the problem space–hearing Levchin describe a typical way physicians handle this sounds almost like “country medicine” compared to using the data, telemetry, and an app.  Combining data, mobility, and more into this app shows how empowering all the technology can be.  We’re all able to start experience this notion of being in so much more control of our lives with these technology tools.

Box / Aaron Levie and Cisco / John Chambers

  • What fun – This was such a fun pairing as the contrast between the people and companies was so interesting.  Yet at the same time, both organizations are developing products for a new world where individuals are far more empowered.  While no one is going to go out and buy their own router, the IT pros that do want to have the capability for you to use the router when you bring in your own device.  A fun part of D in general is when you can see widely different perspectives in a dialog about a problem space each is approaching.
  • IT control – Chambers asserted that the ability for IT to “say no” really changed 4 or 5 years ago and now enterprises need to catch up to consumer technologies and support them.  Chambers even said “BYOD trumps security”.
  • Disruption – Levie offered a wonderful example of how companies are handling disruption.  He said that the three biggest Box customers are companies formed in the 1800’s.  This speaks to how much change is going on among IT pros.

Disney Media / Anne Sweeney  and Producer / I. Marlene King

  • Twitter integration – It was fascinating to hear the content developer view of creating content knowing that Twitter is part of the viewing equation.  There’s a clear perspective that Twitter is contributing to the experience and enjoyment of the show.
  • OMG moments – I loved hearing about the way they essentially create the show to support “OMG” or “jump off the couch” moments, and how that plays into Twitter.
  • Time zones – Turns out that the audience is pretty self-governing when it comes to spoilers and time zones, which was interesting to think about.

Pinterest / Ben Silbermann

  • First appearance – Ben doesn’t often appear or do presentations. It is great to see him.
  • Framing – Another great example of framing the goals of the product: Pinterest aims to help people “discover things they really love and inspire them to experience them in real life.”
  • Early users – From a product development perspective, he spoke about how early users ended up setting the tone of the product when it comes to passion.
  • Last web app? – Kara asked if Silbermann thought that Pinterest might be the “last web first app” or not.  The answer focused on starting off where people were but now today of course the goal is to be able to use the service wherever you are and of course a ton of that is mobile which overtook the PC along the lines of industry trends.

Tesla, SpaceX, Hyper Tube / Elon Musk

  • Along with everyone at D11 and online, this was an incredible treat.
  • “Mars is a fixer upper” – as far as planets go, Musk said Mars is our best bet for life on another planet since it can be fixed up relatively easily.
  • Every tech takes 3 or 4 generations to get it to mass market.  He walked through the original Tesla plan (high price/low volume, mid-price/mid volume, low price/high volume).  He framed this as competing with a hundred years and trillion dollar investment in gas combustion.  This is a great example of how disruption gets talked about in early stages – all the focus on whether electric cars can displace gas cars using the criteria gas cars developed over all this time.  From a product point of view, this perspective is super interesting.

— Steven Sinofsky

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Written by Steven Sinofsky

June 2, 2013 at 12:45 pm

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Conversation #38– disrupt or die

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thCAM164QKAnyone worth their salt in product development knows that listening to customers through any and all means possible is the means to innovation. Wait a minute, anyone worth their salt in product development knows that listening to customers leads to a faster horse.

Deciding your own product choices within these varying perspectives is perhaps the seminal challenge in product development, tech products or otherwise. This truly is a tyranny of or, but one in which changing the rules of the game is the very objective.

In this discussion, which is such a common dialog in the halls of HBS as well tech companies everywhere it should probably be a numbered conversation (for this blog let’s call this Conversation #38 for shorthand—disrupt or die).

For a recent discussion about why it is so difficult for large companies to face changes in the marketplace, see this post Why Corporate Giants Fail to Change.

“Disrupt or die” or “disrupt and die”?

Failure to evolve a product as technologies change or as customer scenarios change is sure to lead to obsolescence or elimination from the marketplace. It is difficult to go a day in tech product development without hearing about technology disruption or “innovator’s dilemma”. The biggest fear we all have in tech is failing to keep up with the changing landscape of technologies and customers, and how those intersect.

At the same time, hopefully we all get to that lucky moment when our product is being used actively by customers who are paying. We’re in that feedback loop. We are improving the product, more is being sold, and we’re on a roll.

That’s when innovation over time looks like this:

Incremental

In this case as time progresses the product improves in a fairly linear way. Listening to customers becomes a critical skill of the product team. Product improvements are touted as “listening to customers” and things seem to go well. This predictability is comforting for the business and for customers.

That is, until one day when needs change or perhaps in addition a new product from a competitor is released. Seemingly out of nowhere the great feedback loop we had looks like it won’t help. If we’re fortunate enough to be in tune to changing dynamics outside our core (and growing) customer base we have time to react and change our own product’s trajectory.

That’s when innovation looks like this:

New Product

This is a time when the market is receptive to a different point of view, and a different product — one that redefines, or reimagines, the category. Sometimes customers don’t even realize they are making a category choice, but all of a sudden they are working differently. People just have stuff to get done and find tools that help.

We’re faced with what seems like an obvious choice—adjust the product feature set and focus to keep up with the new needs of customers. Failing to do so risks losing out on new sales, depth usage, or even marginalization. Of course features/capabilities is a long list that can include price, performance, battery life, reliability, simplicity, APIs, different integration points or service connections, and any other attributes that might be used by a new entrant to deliver a unique point of view around a similar scenario.

Many folks will be quick to point out that such is only the case if a new product is a “substitute” for the product people are newly excited about. There is truth to this. But there is also a reality shown time and time again which gets to the heart of tech bets. It is almost always the case that a new product that is “adjacent” to your product has some elements of more expensive, more complex in some dimensions, less functional, or less than ideal. Then what seems like an obvious choice, which is to adjust your own product, quickly looks like a fool’s bet. Why would you chase an inferior product?  Why go after something that can’t really replace you?

The examples of this are too numerous to count. The iPhone famously sucked at making phone calls (a case where the category of “mobile phone” was under reinvention and making calls turned out to be less important). Solid State storage is famously more expensive and lower capacity than spindle drives (a case where the low power, light weight, small size are more valued in mobile devices). Of course tablets are famously unable to provide apps to replace some common professional PC experiences (a case where the value of mobility, all day battery life, always connected seem more valued than a set of platform capabilities). Even within a large organization we can see how limited feature set cloud storage products are being used actively by employees as “substitutes” for enterprise portals and file shares (a case where cross-organization sharing, available on the internet, and mobile access are more valued than the full enterprise feature set). The list goes on and on.

As product managers we all wish it was such a simple choice when we face these situations. Simply leapfrog the limited feature set product with some features on our profitable product. Unfortunately, not every new product that might compete with us is going to disrupt us. So in addition to facing the challenges of evolving the product, we also have to decide which competitors to go after. Often it takes several different attempts by competitive products to offer just enough in the way of new / different approaches to begin to impact an established product.

Consider for example of how much effort the Linux community put into desktop Linux. And while this was going on, Android and iOS were developed and offered a completely different approach that brings new scenarios to life. A good lesson is that usually a head-on alternative will quite often struggle and might even result in missing other disruptive technologies. Having a unique point of view is pretty important.

The reality of this situation is that it is only apparent in hindsight. While it is going on the changes are so small, the product features so minimal, and the base of the customers choosing a new path so narrow that you don’t realize what is going on. In fact, the new product is also on an incremental innovation path, having attained a small amount of traction, and that incremental innovation rapidly accumulates. There is a tipping point.

That is what makes acting during such a “crisis” so urgent. Since no one is first all the time (almost by definition when you’re the leader), deciding when and how to enter a space is the critical decision point. The irony is that the urgency to act comes at a time when it appears from the inside to be the least urgent.

Choosing to innovate means accepting the challenges

We’ve looked at the landscape and we’ve decided as a team that our own product needs to change course. There is a real risk that our product (business) will be marginalized by a new entry adjacent to us.

We get together and we come up with the features and design to go after these new scenarios and capabilities.

The challenge is that some of what we need to do involves changing course—this is by definition what is going on. You’re Apple and you decide that making phone calls is not the number 1 feature of your new mobile phone or your new tablet won’t run OS X apps. Those are product challenges. You also might face all sorts of challenges in pricing, positioning, and all the things that come from having a stable business model. For example, your competitor offers a free substitute for what you are selling.

The problem is your existing customers have become conditioned to expect improvements along the path we were traveling together. Worse, they are by definition not expecting an “different” product in lieu of a new version of their favorite product. These customers have built up not just expectations, but workflows, extensions, and whole jobs around your product.

But this is not about your existing and best customers, no matter how many, it is about the foundation of your product shifting and you’re seeing new customers use a new product or existing customers use your product less and less.

Moving forward the product gets built and it is time to get it into market for some testing or maybe you just release it.

BOOM!

All that work your marketing team has done over the years to establish what it means to “win” in the space that you were winning is now used against you. All the “criteria” you established against every competitor that came along are used to show that the new product is not a winning product. Except it is not winning in the old way. What you’ve done is become your own worst enemy.

But even then, the new way appears to be the less than optimal way—more expensive, less features, more clicks, or simply not the same at doing things the product used to do.

The early adopters or influential users (that was an old term in the literature, “IEU” or sometimes “lead user”) are immediately taken aback by the change in direction. The workflows, keystroke memory, add-ins, and more are just not the same or no longer optimal–there’s no regard for the new scenarios or capabilities when the old ones are different. Worse, they project their views across all customer segments. “I can’t figure this out, so imagine how hard it will be for my parents” or “this will never be acceptable in the enterprise” are common refrains in tech.

This happens no matter who a product is geared towards or how complex the product was in the first place. It is not how it does anything but the change in how it did things people were familiar with. This could be in user experience, pricing, performance, platform requirements or more.

You’re clearly faced with a set of choices that just don’t look good. In Lean Startup, Eric Ries talks in detail about the transition from early users of a new product to a wider audience. In this context, what happens is that the early users expect (or tolerate) a very different set of features and have very different expectations about what is difficult or easy. His conclusion is that it is painful to make the transition, but at some point your learning is complete and it is time to restart the process of learning by focusing on the broader set of customers.

In evolving an existing product, the usage of a pre-release is going to look a lot like the usage of the current release. The telemetry proves this for you, just to make this an even more brutal challenge. In addition, because of the years of effort the enthusiasts put into doing things a certain way and all that work establishing criteria for how a product should work, the obvious thing to do when testing a new release is to try everything out the old release did and compare to the old product (the one you are changing course of) and then maybe some new stuff.  This looks a lot like what Eric describes for startups. For products in market, the moment is pretty much like the startup moment since your new product is sort of a startup, but for a new trajectory.

Remember what brought us here, two things:

  • The environment of usage or business around the product was changing and a bet was made that changes were material to the team. With enough activity in the market, someone will always argue that this change is different and the old and new will coexist and not cannibalize each other (tell that to PalmPilot owners who swore phones would be separate from calendar and contacts, or GPS makers who believe in stand-alone units, or…).
  • A reminder that if Henry Ford had asked customers what they wanted from a car they would have said a faster horse. The market was conditioned to ask for and/or expect improvements along a certain trajectory and no matter what you are changing that trajectory.

All the data is flowing in that shows the new product is not the old product on the old path. Not every customer is interested in doing new things, especially the influential testers who generally focus on the existing ways of doing things, have domain expertise, and are often the most connected to the existing product and all that it encompasses. There is an irony in that for tech these customers are also the most tech-savvy.

Pretty quickly, listening to customers is looking exceedingly difficult.

If you listen to customers (and vector back to the previous path in some way: undo, product modes, multiple products/SKUs, etc.) you will probably cede the market to the new entrants or at least give them more precious time. If technology product history is any guide, pundits will declare you will be roadkill in fairly short order as you lack a strategic response. There’s a good chance your influential customers will rejoice as they can go back and do what they always did.  You will then be left without an answer for what comes next for your declining usage patterns.

If you don’t listen to customers (and stick to your guns) you are going to “alienate” folks and cede the market to someone who listens. If technology product history is any guide, pundits will declare that your new product is not resonating with the core audience. Pundits will also declare that you are stubborn and not listening to customers.

All of this is monumentally difficult simply because you had a successful product. Such is the price of success. Disrupting is never easy, but it is easier if you have nothing to lose.

Many folks will be quick to say that new products are fine but they should just have the old product’s way of doing things. This can seem like asking for a Prius with a switch to turn off the battery (my 2002 Prius came with a training DVD, parking attendant reference card, and more!). There are many challenges with the “side by side” approach. The most apparent is that it only delays the change (meaning delays your entry into the new market or meeting of new scenarios). Perhaps in a world of cloud-services this is more routine where you have less of a “choice” in the change, but the operational costs are real. In client code/apps the challenge becomes very quickly doing things twice. The more complex the changes are the more costly this becomes. In software nothing is free.

Product development is a social science.

People and time

In this numbered conversation, “disrupt or die” there are a few factors that are not often discussed in detail when all the debates happen.

First, people adapt. The assumption, especially about complex tech products, is that people have difficulty or lack of desire to change. While you can always overshoot the learning people can or are willing to do, people are the most adaptable part of a system. One way to think about this is that every successful product in use today, those that we all take for granted, were introduced to a customer base that had to change behavior.  We would not be where we are today without changing and adapting.  If one reflects, the suboptimal change (whether for the people that are customers or the people running a business) is apparent with every transition we have made.  Even today’s tablets are evidence of this.  Some say they are still for “media consumption” and others say they are “productivity tools”.  But behind the scenes, people (and developers) are rapidly and actively changing and adapting to the capabilities of tablets because the value proposition is so significantly improved in some dimensions.

Second, time matters. Change is only relative to knowledge people have at a moment in time and the customers you have at the moment. New people are entering the customer base all the time and there is a renewal in skills, scenarios, and usage patterns. Five years ago almost no one used a touch screen for very much.  Today, touch is a universally accepted (and expected) input method.  The customer base has adapted and also renewed around touch.  Universities are the world’s experts at understanding this notion of renewal. They know that any change to policy at a university is met with student resistance (especially in the spring). They also know that next year, 25% of the “customer base” will be replaced. And in 3 summers all the students on campus will only know the new way. One could call that cynical. One could also call that practical.

Finally time means that major product change, disruption, is always a multi-step process. Whether you make a bet to build a new product that disrupts the market dynamics or change an existing product that disrupts your own product, it rarely happens in one step.  Phones added copy/paste and APIs and even got better at the basics.  The pivot is the tool of the new endeavor until there is some traction.  Feedback, refinement, and balancing the need to move to a new space with the need to satisfy the installed base are the tools of the established product “pivoting” in response to a changed world.  It takes time and iteration–just the same way it took time and iteration to get to the first summit.  Never lose sight of the fact that disrupting is also product development and all the challenges that come from that remain–just because you’re disrupting does not mean what you do will be perfect–but that’s a given we all work with all the time.  We always operate knowing there is more change to come, improvements and fixes, as we all to learn by shipping.

Part of these factors almost always demonstrate, at least in the medium term, that disruption is not synonymous with elimination.  Those championing disruption often over-estimate progress towards elimination in the short term.  Though history has shown the long term to be fairly predictable.  Black cars are still popular.  They just aren’t the only cars.

Product development choices are based on social science. There is never a right answer. Context is everything.  You cannot A/B test your way to big bets or decisions about technology disruption. That’s what makes all of this so fun!!

Go change the rules of the game!

–Steven Sinofsky

Note.  I believe “disrupt or die” is the name of a highly-regarded management class at General Electric’s management school.

Written by Steven Sinofsky

May 8, 2013 at 1:00 pm

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Forking responsibly

with 2 comments

Twilight movie posterIn a previous post, the topic of surviving legacy code was discussed.  Browsers (or rendering engines within browsers) represent an interesting case of mission critical code as described in the post.  A few folks noticed yesterday that Google has started a new rendering engine based on the WebKit project (“This was not an easy decision.” according to the post)

Relative to moving legacy code forward this raises some interesting product development challenges.  This blog focuses on product development and the tradeoffs that invariably arise, and definitely not about being critical or analyzing choices made by others, as there are many other places to gain those perspectives. It is worth looking at actions through the lens of the product development discipline.

In this specific case there is an existing code base, legacy code, and a desire to move the code base forward.  Expressed in the announcement, however briefly, is the architectural challenge faced by maintaining the multi-process architecture.  Relative to the taxonomy from the previous post, this is a clear case of the challenges of moving an architecture forward.  The challenge is pretty cut and dry.

The approach taken is one that looks very much a break in the evolution of the code base, a “fork” as described some.  Also at work are efforts after forking to delete unused code, which is another technique for managing legacy code described previously.   These are perfectly reasonable ways to move a code base forward, but also come with some challenges worth discussing.

What the fork?

(OK, I couldn’t resist that, or the title of this post).

Forking a code base is not just something one can do in the open source world, though there is somewhat of a special meaning there.  It is a general practice applicable to any code base.  In fact, robust source code control systems are deliberate in supporting forks because that is how one experiments on a code base, evolves it asynchronously, or just maintains distinct versions of the code.

A fork can be a temporary state, or sometimes called a branch when there are several and the intent to be temporary is clear.  This is what one does to experiment on an alternate implementation or experiment on a new feature.  After the experiment the changes are merged back in (or not) and the branch is closed off.  Evolution of the code base moves forward as a singular effort.

A fork can also be permanent.  This is where one can either reap significant benefits or introduce significant challenges, or both, in evolving the code.  One can imagine forks that look like one of these two:

Dinner forkRoad fork

In the first case, the two paths stay in parallel.  That’s an interesting approach.  It is essentially saying that the code will do the same thing, but differently.  In code one would use this approach if you wanted to maintain two variations of the same product but have different teams working on them.  The differences between the two forks are known and planned.  There’s a routine process for sharing changes as each of the branches evolve.  In many ways, one could view the current state of webkit as this state since at no point is there a definitive version in use by every party.  You might just call this type of fork a parallel evolution.

In the second case, the two paths diverge and diverge more over time.  This too is an interesting approach.  This type of fork is a one-time operation and then the evolution of each of the branches proceeds at the discretion of each development team.  This approach says that the goals are no longer aligned and different paths need to be followed.  There’s no limitation to sharing or merging changes, but this would happen opportunistically, not systematically.  Comments from both resulting efforts of the WebKit fork reinforce the loosely coupled nature of the fork, including deleting the code unused by the respective forks along with a commitment to stay in communication.

For any given project, both of these could be appropriate.  In terms of managing legacy code, both are making the statement that the existing code is no longer on the right evolutionary path—whether this is a technical, business, or engineering challenge.

Forking is a revolutionary change to a code base.  It is sort of the punctuation in a punctuated equilibrium.  It is an admission that the path the code and team were on is no longer working.

Maintaining functionality

The most critical choice to make when forking code is to have an understanding of where the functionality goes.  In the taxonomy of managing legacy code, a fork is a reboot, not a recast.

From a legacy code perspective, the choice to fork is the same as a choice to rewrite.  Forking is just an expedient way to get started.  Rather than start from an empty source tree, one can visualize the fork as a tree copy of all the existing code to a new project and a fast start.  This isn’t cheating.  It can be a big asset or a big liability.

As an asset, if you start from all the same existing code then the chances of being compatible in terms of features, performance, and quality are pretty high.  Early in the project your code base looks a lot like the one you started from.  The differences are the ones you immediately introduce—deleting code you don’t think you need, rewriting some parts critical to you, refactoring/restructuring for better engineering.  All of these are software changes and that means, definitionally, there will be regressions relative to the starting point in the neighborhood of 10%.

On the other hand, a fork done this way can also introduce a liability.  If you start from the same code you were just using, then you bring with it all the architecture and features that you had before of course.  The question becomes what were you going away from?  What was it that could not be worked into the code base the way it stood?  The answers to these questions can provide insights into the balance between maintaining exact functionality out of the gate and how fast and well you can evolve towards your new goals down the road.

In both cases, the functionality of the other fork is not standing still (though on a project where your team controls both forks, you can decide resource levels or amount of change tolerated in one or the other fork).   The functionality of the two code bases will necessarily diverge just because everything would need to be done twice and the same way, which will prove to be impossible.  In the case of WebKit it is worth noting that it was derived from a fork of KHTML, which has since had a challenging path (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebKit).

Point of view required

As said, the process of rebooting via any means is a perfectly viable way to move forward in the face of legacy code challenges.  What makes it possible to understand a decision to fork is having (or communicating) a point of view as to why a fork (a reboot, rewrite) is the right approach.  A point of view simply says what problem is being solved and why the approach solves the problem in a robust manner.

To arrive at such a conclusion, the team needs to have an open and honest dialog about the direction things need to go and the capabilities of the team and existing code to move forward.  Not everyone will ever agree—engineers are notoriously polarizing, or some might say “religious”, at moments like this.  Those that wrote the code are certain they know how to move it forward.  Those that did not write the code cannot imagine how it could possibly move forward.  All want ways to code with minimal distraction from their highest priorities. Open minds, experimentation, and sharing of data are the tools for the team to use to work (and work it is) to a shared approach for the fork to work.

If the team chooses a reboot the critical information to articulate is the point of view of “why”.  In other words, what are assumptions about the existing code are no longer valid in some new direction or strategy.   Just as critically are the new bets or new assumptions that will drive decision making.

This is not a story for the outside world, but is critical to the successful engineering of the code.  You really need to know what is different—and that needs to map to very clear choices where one set of assumptions leads to one implementation and another set of assumptions leads to very different choices.  Open source turns this engineering dialog into an externally visible dialog between engineers.

Every successful fork is one that has a very clear set of assumptions that are different from the original code base.

If you don’t have a different set of assumptions that are so clearly different to the developers doing the work, then the chances are you will just be forked and not really drive a distinct evolutionary path in terms of innovation.

Knowing this point of view – what are the pillars driving a change in code evolution – turns into the story that will get told when the next product releases.  This story will not only need to explain what is new, but ultimately as a matter of engineering, will need to explain to all parties why some things don’t quite work the way they do with the other fork, past or present at time of launch.

If you don’t have this point of view when you start the project, you’re not going to be able to create one later in the project.  The “narrative” of a project gets created at the start.  Only marketing and spin can create a story different than the one that really took place.

–Steven

Written by Steven Sinofsky

April 5, 2013 at 9:00 am

Posted in posts

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Surviving legacy code

with 36 comments

Scene from the film "Back to the future" featuring the DeLorean car, Michael J. Fox and Christopher LloydIn the software industry, legacy code is a phrase often used as a negative by engineers and pundits alike to describe the anchor around our collective necks that prevents software from moving forward in innovative ways.  Perhaps the correlation between legacy and stagnation is not so obvious—consider that all code is legacy code as soon it is used by customers and clouds alike.

Legacy code is everywhere. Every bit of software we use, whether in an app on a phone, in the cloud, or installed on our PC is legacy code.  Every bit of that code is being managed by a team of people who need to do something with it: improve it, maintain it, age it out.  The process of evolving code over time is much more challenging than it appears on the face of it.  Much like urban planning, it is easy to declare there should be mass transit, a new bridge, or a new exit, but figuring out how to design and engineer a solution free of disruptions or worse is extremely challenging.  While one might think software is not concrete and steel, it has a structural integrity well beyond the obvious.

One of the more interesting aspects of Lean Startup for me is the notion of building products quickly and then reworking/pivoting/redoing them as you learn more from early adopters.  This works extremely well for small code and customer bases.  Once you have a larger code base or paying [sic] customers, there are limits to the ability to rewrite code or change your product, unless the number of new target customers greatly exceeds the number of existing customers.  There exists a potential to slow or constrain innovation, or the reduced ability to serve as a platform for innovation. So while being free of any code certainly removes any engineering constraint, few projects are free of existing code for very long.

We tend to think of legacy code in the context of large commercial systems with support lifecycles and compatibility.  In practice, lifting the hood of any software project in use by customers will have engineers talking about parts of the system that are a combination of mission critical and very hard to work near.  Every project has code that might be deemed too hot to handle, or even radioactive.  That’s legacy code.

This post looks at why code is legacy so quickly and some patterns.  There’s no simple choice as to how to move forward but being deliberate and complete in how you do turns out to be the most helpful.  Like so many things, this product development challenge is highly dependent on context and goals.  Regardless, the topic of legacy is far more complex and nuanced than it might appear.

One person’s trash is another’s treasure

Whether legacy code is part of our rich heritage to be brought forward or part of historical anomalies to be erased from usage is often in the eye of the beholder.  The newer or more broadly used some software is the more likely we are to see a representation of all views.  The rapid pace of change across the marketplace, tools and techniques (computer science), and customer usage/needs only increases the velocity code moves to achieve legacy status.

In today’s environment, it is routine to talk about how business software is where the bulk of legacy code exists because businesses are slow to change.  The inability to change quickly might not reflect a lack of desire, but merely prudence.  A desire to improve upon existing investments rather than start over might be viewed as appropriately conservative as much as it might be stubborn and sticking to the past.

Business software systems are the heart and soul of what differentiates one company’s offering from another.  These are the treasures of a company.  Think about the difference between airlines or banks as you experience them.  Different companies can have substantially different software experiences and yet all of them need to connect to enormously complex infrastructures.  This infrastructure is a huge asset for the company and yet is also where changes need to happen.  These systems were all created long before there was an idea of consumers directly accessing every aspect of the service.  And yet with that access has come an increasing demand for even more features and more detailed access to the data and services we all know are there.  We’re all quick to think of the software systems as trash when we can’t get the answer or service we want when we want it when we know it is in there somewhere.

Businesses also run systems that are essential but don’t necessarily differentiate one business from another or are just not customer facing.  Running systems internally for a company to create and share information, communicate, or just run the “plumbing” of a company (accounting, payroll) are essential parts of what make a company a company.  Defining, implementing, and maintaining these is exactly the same amount of work as the customer facing systems.  These systems come with all the same burdens of security, operations, management, and more.

Only today, many of these seem to have off-the-shelf or cloud alternatives.  Thus the choices made by a company to define the infrastructure of the company quickly become legacy when there appear to be so many alternatives entering the marketplace.  To the company with a secure and manageable environment these systems are assets or even treasures.  To the folks in a company “stuck” using something that seems more difficult or worse than something they can use on the web, these seem like crazy legacy systems, or maybe trash.

Companies, just as cities, need to adapt and change and move forward.  There’s not an option to just keep running things as they are—you can’t grow or retain customers if your service doesn’t change but all the competitors around you do.  So your treasure is also your legacy—everything that got you to where you are is also part of what needs to change.

Thinking about the systems consumers use quickly shows how much of the consumer world is burdened by existing software that fits this same mold—is the existing system trash or treasure?  The answer is both and it just depends on who you ask or even how you ask.

Consumer systems today are primarily service-based.  As such the pace of change is substantially different from the pace of change of the old packaged software world since changes only need take place at the service end without action by consumers.  This rapid pace of change is almost always viewed as a positive, unless it isn’t.

The services we all use are amazing treasures once they become integral to our lives. Mail, social networking, entertaining, as well as our banking and travel tools are all treasures.  They can make our lives easier and more fun.  They are all amazing and complex software systems running at massive scale. To the companies that build and run these systems, they are the company treasures.  They are the roads and infrastructure of a city.

If you want to start an uproar with a consumer service, then just change the user interface a bit.  One day your customers (users, people) sign on and there’s a who moved my cheese moment.  Unlike the packaged software world, no choice was made no time was set aside, rather just when you needed to check your mail, update status, or read some news everything is different.  Generally the more acute your experience is the more wound up you get about the change.  Unlike adding an extra button on an already crowded toolbar, a menu command at the end of a long menu, or just a new set of optional customizations, this in your face change is very rarely well-received.

Sometimes you don’t even need to change your service, but just say you’re going to shut it down and no longer offer it.  Even if the service hasn’t changed in a long time or usage has not increased, all of a sudden that legacy system shows up as someone’s treasure.  City planners trying to find new uses for a barely used public facility or rezone a parking lot often face incredible resistance from a small but stable customer population, even if the resources could be better used for a more people.  That old abandoned building is declared an historic landmark, even if it goes unused. No matter how low the cost or how rich the provider, resources are finite.

The uproar that comes from changing consumer software represents customers clamoring for a maintaining the legacy.  When faced with a change, it is not uncommon to see legacy viewed as a heritage and not the negatives usually associated with software legacy.

Often those most vocal about the topic have polarizing views on changes.  Platforms might be fragmented and the desire is expressed to get everyone else to change their (browser, runtime, OS) to keep things modern and up to date—and this is expressed with extreme zest for change regardless of the cost to others.  At the same time, things that impact a group of influentials or early adopters are most assailed when they do change in ways that run counter to convential wisdom.

Somewhere in this world where change and new are so highly valued and same represents old and legacy, is a real product development challenge.  There are choices to be made in product development about the acceptance and tolerance of change, the need to change, and the ability to change.  These are questions without obvious answers.  While one person’s trash is another’s treasure makes sense in the abstract, what are we to do when it comes to moving systems forward.

Why legacy?

Let’s assume it is impossible to really say whether code is legacy to be replaced or rewritten or legacy to be preserved and cherished.  We should stipulate this because it doesn’t really matter for two reasons:

  • Assuming we’re not going to just shut down the system, it will change.  Some people will like the change and other’s will not.  One person’s treasure is another’s trash.
  • Software engineering is a young and evolving field.  Low-level architecture, user interaction, core technologies, tools, techniques, and even tastes will change, and change dramatically.  What was once a treasured way to implement something will eventually become obsolete or plain dumb.

These two points define the notion that all existing code is legacy code.  The job of product development is to figure out which existing code is a treasure and which is trash.

It is worth having a decision framework for what constitutes trash for your project.  Part of every planning process should include a deliberate notion of what code is being treated as trash and what code is a treasure.  The bigger the system, the more important it is to make sure everyone is on the same page in this regard.  Inconsistencies in how change is handled can lead to frustrated or confused customers down the road.

Written with different assumptions

When a system is created, it is created with a whole host of assumptions.  In fact, a huge base of assumptions are not even chosen deliberately at the start of a project.  From the programming language to the platform to the basic architecture are chosen rather quickly at the start of a project.  It turns out these put the system on a trajectory that will consistently reinforce assumptions.

We’ve seen detailed write-ups of the iOS platform and the evolution of apps relative to screen attributes.  On the one hand developers coding to iOS know the specifics of the platform and can “lock” that assumption—a treasure for everyone.  Then characteristics of screens potentially change (ppi, aspect ratio, size) and the question becomes whether preserving the fixed point is “supporting legacy” or “holding back innovation”.

While that is a specific example, consider broader assumptions such as bandwidth, cpu v. gpu capability, or even memory.  An historic example would be how for the first ten years of PC software there was an extreme focus on reducing the amount of memory or disk storage used by software.  Y2K itself was often blamed on people trying to save a few bits in memory or on disk. Structures were packed.  Overlays were used.  Data stored in binary on disk.

Then one day 32-bits, virtual memory and fast gigabyte disks become normal.  For a short time there was a debate about sloppy software development (“why use 32 bits to represent 0-255?”) but by and large software developers were making different assumptions about what was the right starting point.  Teams went through code systematically widening words, removing complexity of the 16 bit address space, and so on.

These changes came with a cost—it took time and effort to update applications for a new screen or revisit code for bit-packing assumptions.  These seem easy and right in hindsight—these happen to be transparent to end-users.  But to a broad audience these changes were work and the assumptions built into the code so innocently just became legacy.

It is easy for us to visualize changes in hardware driving these altered assumptions.  But assumptions in the software environment are just as pervasive.  Concepts ranging from changes in interaction widgets (commands to toolbars to context sensitive) to metaphors (desktop or panels) or even assumptions about what is expected behavior (spell checking).  The latter is interesting because the assumption of having a local dictionary improve over time and support local custom dictionaries was state of the art.  Today the expectation is that a web service is the best way to know how to spell something.  That’s because you can assume connectivity and assume a rich backend.

When you start a new project, you might even take a step back and try to list all of the assumptions you’re making.  Are you assuming screen size or aspect ratio, keyboard or touch, unlimited bandwidth, background processing, single user, credit cards, left to right typing, or more.  It is worth noting that in the current climate of cross-platform development, the assumptions made on target platforms can differ quite a bit—what is easy or cheap on one platform might be impossible or costly on another.  So your assumptions might be inherited from a target platform.  It is rather incredible the long list of things one might assume at the start of a project and each of those translates into a potential roadblock into evolving your system.

Evolved views of well-architected

Software engineering is one of the youngest engineering disciplines.  The whole of the discipline is a generation, particularly if you consider the micro-processor based view of the field.  As defined by platforms, the notion of what constitutes a well-architected system is something that changes over time.  This type of legacy challenge is one that influences engineers in terms of how they think about a project—this is the sort of evolution that makes it easy or difficult to deliver new features, but might not be visible to those using the system.

As an example, the evolution of where code should be executed in a system parallels the evolution of software engineering.  From thin-client mainframes to rich-client tightly-coupled client/server to service-oriented architecture we see very different views of the most fundamental choice about where to put code.  From modular to structured to object-oriented programming and more we see fundamentally different choices about how to structure code.  From a focus on power, cores, and compute cycles to graphics, mobility, and battery life we see dramatic changes in what it means to be modern and well-architected.

The underlying architecture of a system affords developers a (far too) easy way to declare something as legacy code to be reworked.  We all know a system written in COBOL is legacy.  We all know if a system is a stateful client application to install in order to use the system it needs to be replaced.

When and how to make these choices is much more complex.  These systems are usually critical to the operations of a business and it is often entirely possible (or even easier) to continue to deliver functionality on the existing system rather than attempt to replace the system entirely.

One of the most eye-opening examples of this for me is the description of the software developed for the Space Shuttle, which is a long-term project with complexity beyond what can even be recreated, see Architecture of the space shuttle primary avionics software systemThe state of the art in software had moved very far, but the risks or impossibility of a modern and current architecture outweighed the benefits.  We love to say that not every project is the space shuttle, but if you’re building the accounts system for a bank, then that software is as critical to the bank as avionics are to the shuttle.  Mission critical is not only an absolute (“lives at stake”) but also relative in terms of importance to the organization.

A very smart manager of mine once said “given a choice, developers will always choose to rewrite the code that is there to make it better”.  What he meant was that taken from a pure engineering approach, developers would gladly rewrite a body of code in order to bring it up to modern levels.  But the downside of this is multi-faceted.  There’s an opportunity cost.  There’s often an inability to clearly understand the full scope of the existing system.  And of course, basic software engineering says that 10% of all code changes will yield regressions.  Simply reworking code because the definition of well-architected changed might not always be prudent. The flip side of being modern is sometimes the creation of second system syndrome.

Changed notion of extensibility

All software systems with staying power have some notion of extensibility or a platform.  While this could be as obvious as an API for system services, it could also be an add-in model, a wire protocol, or even file formats.  Once your system introduces extensibility it becomes a platform.  Someone, internal or external, will take advantage of your extensibility in ways you probably didn’t envision.  You’ve got an instant legacy, but this legacy is now a dependency to external partners critical to your success.

In fact, your efforts at delivering goodness have quickly transformed someone else’s efforts.  What was a feature to you can become a mission critical effort to your customer.  This is almost always viewed as big win—who doesn’t want people depending on your software in this way.  In fact, it was probably the goal to get people to bet their efforts on your extensibility. Success.

Until you want to change it.  Then your attempts to move your platform forward are constrained by what put in place in the first version.  And often your first version was truly a first version.  All the understanding you had of what people wanted to do and what they would do are now informed by real experience.  While you can do tons of early testing and pre-release work, a true platform takes a long time before it becomes clear where efforts at tapping extensibility will be focused.

During this time you might even find that the availability of one bit of extensibility caused customers to look at other parts of your system and invent their own extensibility or even exploit the extensibility you provided in ways you did not intend.

In fact whole industries can spring up based on pushing the limits of your extensibility: browser toolbars, social network games, startup programs.

Elements of your software system that are “undocumented implementation” get used by many for good uses.  Reversed engineered file formats, wire protocols, or just hooking things at a low level all provide valuable functionality for data transfer, management, or even making systems accessible to users with special needs.

Taking it a step further, extensibility itself (documented or implied) becomes the surface area to exploit for those wishing to do evil things to your system or to use your system as a vector for evil.

What was once a beautiful and useful treasure can quickly turn into trash or worse.  Of course if bad things are happening then you can seek to remove the surface area exposed by your system and even then you can be surprised at the backlash that comes.  A really interesting example of this is back in 1999 when the “Melissa” virus exploited the automation in Outlook.  The reaction was to disable the automation which broke a broad class of add-ins and ended up questioning the very notion of extensibility and automation in email.  We’ve seen similar dynamics with viral gaming in social networks where the benefits are clear but once exploited the extensibility can quickly become a liability.  Melissa was not a security hole at the time, but since then the notion of extensibility has been redefined and so systems with or utilizing such extensibility get viewed as legacy systems that need to be thought through.

Used differently

While a system is being developed, there are scenarios and workflows that define the overall experience.  Even with the best possible foresight, it is well-established that there is a high error rate in determining how a system will be used in the real world.  Some of these errors are fairly gross but many are more nuanced, and depend on the context of usage.  The more general purpose a system is the more likely it is to find the usage of a system to be substantially different from what it was designed to do.  Conversely, the more task-oriented a system is the more likely it is to quickly see the mistakes or sub-optimal choices that got made.

Usage quickly gets to assumptions built into the system.  List boxes designed to hold 100 names work well unless everyone has 1000 names in their lists.  Systems designed for high latency networks behave differently when everyone has broadband.  And while your web site might be great on a 15” laptop, one day you might find more people accessing it from a mobile browser with touch.  These represent the rug being pulled out from under your usage assumptions.  Your system implementation became legacy while people are just using it because they used it differently than you assumed.

At the same time, your views evolve on where you might want to take the system or experience.  You might see new ways of input based on innovative technologies, new ways of organizing the functionality based on usage or increase in feature scope, or whole new features that change the flow of your system.  These step-function changes are based on your role as designer of a system and evolving it to new usage scenarios.

Your view at the time when designing the changes is that you’re moving from the legacy system.  Your customers think of the system as treasure.  You view your change as the new treasure.  Will your customers think of them as treasure or trash?

In these cases the legacy is visible and immediately runs into the risks of alienating those using your system.  Changes will be dissected and debated among the core users (even for an internal system—ask the finance team how they like the new invoicing system, for example).  Among breadth users the change will be just that, a change.  Is the change a lot better or just a lot different?  In your eyes or customer’s eyes?  Are all customers the same?

We’re all familiar with the uproar that happens when user interface changes.  Starting from the version upgrades of DOS classics like dBase or 1-2-3 through the most recent changes to web-based email search, or social networking, changing the user experience of existing systems to reflect new capabilities or usage is easily the most complex transformation existing, aka legacy, code must endure.

Approaches

If you waded through the above examples of what might make existing code legacy code you might be wondering what in the world you can do?  As you’ve come to expect from this blog, there’s no easy answer because the dynamics of product development are complex and the choices dependent upon more variables than you can “compute”.  Product development is a system of linear equations with more variables than equations.

The most courageous efforts of software professionals involve moving systems forward.  While starting with a clean slate is often viewed as brave and creative, the reality is that it takes a ton of bravery and creativity to decide how to evolve a system.  Even the newest web service quickly becomes an enormous challenge to change—the combination of engineering complexities and potential for choosing “wrong” are enough to overwhelm any engineer.  Anyone can just keep something running, but keeping something running while moving it to new and broader uses defines the excitement of product development.

Once you have a software system in place with customers/users, and you want to change some existing functionality there are a few options you can choose from.

  • Remove code.  Sometimes the legacy code can just be removed.  The code represents functionality that should no longer be part of your system.  Keeping in mind that almost no system has something totally unused, you’re going to run into speed bumps and resistance.  While it is often easy to think of removing a feature, chances are there are architectural dependencies throughout a large system that depend on not just the feature but how it is implemented. Often the cost of keeping an implementation around is much lower than the perceived benefit from not having it.  There’s an opportunity to make sure that the local desire to have fewer old lines of code to worry about is not trumping a global desire to maintain stability in the overall development process.   On the other hand, there can be a high cost or impossibility to keeping the old code around.  The code might not meet modern standards for privacy or security, even though it is not executed it exposes surface area that could be executed, for example.
  • Run side by side.  The most common refrain for any user-interface changes to existing code is to leave both implementations running and just allow a compatibility mode or switch to return to the old way of running.  Because the view is that leaving around code is usually not so high cost it is often the case that those on the outside of a project view it as relatively low cost to leave old code paths around.  As easy as this sounds, the old code path still has operational complexities (in the case of a service) and/or test matrix complexities that have real costs even if there is no runtime cost to those not accessing it (code not used doesn’t take up memory or drain power).  The desire most web developers have to stop supporting older browsers is essentially this argument—keeping around the existing code is more trouble than it might be worth.  Side by side is almost never a practical engineering alternative.  From a customer point of view it seems attractive except inevitably the question becomes “how long can I keep running things the old way”.  Something claimed to be a transition quickly turns into a permanent fixture.  Sometimes that temporary ramp the urban planners put in becomes pretty popular.  There’s a fun Harvard Business School case on the design of the Office Ribbon ($) that folks might enjoy since it tees up this very question.
  • Rewrite underneath.  When there are changes in architectural assumptions one approach is to just replumb the system.  Developers love this approach.  It is also enormously difficult.  Implicit in taking this approach is that the rest of the system “above” will function properly in the face of a changed implementation underneath or that there is an obvious match from one generation of plumbing to another.  While we all know good systems have abstractions and well-designed interfaces, these depend on characteristics of the underlying architecture.  An example of this is what happens when you take advantage of a great architecture like file i/o and then change dramatically the characteristics of the system by using SSDs.  While you want everything to just be faster, we know that the whole system depended on the latency and responsiveness of systems that operated an order of magnitude slower.  It just isn’t as simple as rewriting—the changes will ripple throughout the system.
  • Stage introduction.  Given the complexities of both engineering and rolling out a change to customers, often a favored approach is the staged rollout.  In this approach the changes are integrated over time through a series of more palatable changes.  Perhaps there are architectural changes done first or perhaps some amount of existing functionality is maintained initially.  Ironically, this brings us back to the implication that most businesses are the ones slow to change and have the most legacy.  In fact, businesses most often employ the staged rollout of system changes.  This seems to be the most practical.  It doesn’t have the drama of a disruptive change or the apparent smoothness of a compatibility mode, and it does take longer.

Taking these as potential paths to manage transitions of existing code, one might get discouraged.  It might even be that it seems like the only answer is to start over.  When thinking through all the complexities of evolving a system, starting over, or rebooting, becomes appealing very quickly.

Dilemma of rebooting

Rebooting a system has a great appeal when faced with a complex system that is hard to manage, was architected for a different era, and is loaded with dated assumptions.

This is even more appealing when you consider that the disruption going on in the marketplace that is driving the need for a whole new approach is likely being led by a new competitor that has no existing customers or legacy.  This challenge gets to the very heart of the innovator’s dilemma (or disruptive technologies).  How can you respond when you’ve got a boat anchor of code?

Sometimes you can call this a treasure or an asset.  Often you call them customers.

It is very easy to say you want to rewrite a system.  The biggest challenge is in figuring out if you mean literally rewrite it or simply recast it.  A rewrite implies that you will carry forth everything you previously had but somehow improved along the dimension driving the need to rework the system.  This is impossibly hard.  In fact it is almost impossible to name a total rewrite that worked without some major disruption, a big bet, and some sort of transition plan that was itself a major effort.

The dilemma in rewriting the system is the amount of work that goes into the transition.  Most systems are not documented or characterized well-enough to even know if you have completely and satisfactorily rewritten it.  The implications for releasing a system that you believe is functionally equivalent but turns out not to be are significant in terms if mismatched customer expectations.  Even small parts of a system can be enormously complex to rewrite in the sense of bringing forward all existing functionality.

On the other hand, if you have a new product that recasts the old one, but along the lines of different assumptions or different characteristics then it is possible to set expectations correctly while you have time to complete the equivalent of a rewrite or while customers get used to what is missing.  There are many challenges that come from implementing this approach as it is effectively a side-by-side implementation but for the entire product, not just part of the code.

Of course an alternative is just an entirely new product that is positioned to do different things well, even if it does some of the existing product.  Again, this simply restates the innovator’s dilemma argument.  The only difference is that you employ this for your own system.

The biggest frustration software folks have with the “build a new system that doesn’t quite do everything the old one did” is the immediate realization of what is missing.  From mail clients to word processors to development tools and more, anything that comes along that is entirely new and modern is immediately compared to the status quo.  This is enormously frustrating because of course as software people we are familiar with what is missing, just as we’re familiar with finite time and resources.  It is even more interesting when the comparison is made to a competitor who only does new things in a modern way.  Solid state storage is fast, reliable, and more. How often it was described as expensive and low capacity relative to 1TB spindle drives.  Which storage are we using today—on our phones, tablets, pcs, and even in the cloud? Cost came down and capacities increased.

It is also just as likely that featured deemed missing in some comparison to the existing technology leader will prove to be less interesting as time goes by.  Early laptops that lacked wired networking or RGB ports were viewed quite negatively. Today these just aren’t critical.  It isn’t that networking or projection aren’t critical, but these have been recast in terms of implementation.  Today we think of Wi-Fi or 4G along with technologies for wireless screen sharing, rather than wires for connectivity.  The underlying scenario didn’t change, just a radical transformation of how it gets done.

This leads to the reality that systems will converge.  While you might think “oh we’ll never need that again” there’s a good chance that even a newly recast, or reimagined, view of a system will quickly need to pick up features and capabilities previously developed.

One person’s treasure is another’s trash.

–Steven Sinofsky

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Written by Steven Sinofsky

April 2, 2013 at 9:00 am

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Dealing with doubt and over-confidence in building something new

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Walking the new product development tightrope between confidence and doubt.  Symbolized by a woman walking a tightrope across a big city skyscape.When you’re creating a new product or service, whether as a startup or within a big company, you’re going to be faced with doubters from every direction.  People on the team, your boss, your peers, your investors, friends, family.  Even when the first outsiders see the product they will probably be more doubtful than supportive.  The most important thing is to avoid doubting yourself.

If you thought up the idea, got funding or approval to go forward then persevering is a key part of getting the work done.  The doubting you’ll most certainly get can feel almost crippling.  In the extreme it turns into those increasing moments of self-doubt and ultimately a loss of confidence.  That self-doubt can prevent new ideas, new products, from growing to success.

The converse of this behavior is to dig your heels in and to just stubbornly move ahead as though no one has expressed any doubt.  You’re getting stuff done.  As things progress there’s a good chance you’re increasing the distance between you and your early supporters-but-doubters.  That over-confidence can prevent new ideas, new products, from making small but necessary changes that can substantially increase their chances for success.

Finding the right balance between caving in and stubborn is something everyone can work on.  There’s no right answer, but you can look for signs or signals that your balance needs some tuning.

5 ways to doubt

Doubts are going to be everywhere in a new venture.  In new products there are a few common doubts that you should be mentally prepared to hear.  If you know these are coming you can use that as a chance to consider how you are going to engage in a discussion about that sort of doubt—not how you dispense with or handle the doubt, but how you can talk about why you might have a different point of view.

  • Been done before.  Very few new products are “new to the world inventions”.  Even things that are new to the world often solve pretty well-known problems.  In reality most all products are incremental when you step back and consider the full context and landscape.  From Velcro® to the Swiffer ® to Facebook and Instagram, these products were incredibly innovative but by and large the innovation amounted to new combinations of some new technologies aimed at solving somewhat known problems.  You can get yourself in quite a spiral if you think your product needs to be an invention versus an innovation.  Thinking about your innovation and value delivered can help you through this.
  • Just a feature.  In new services in the tech industry we constantly see people saying that a new product is “just a feature”.  There’s always some truth to that, but it is because it has to do—as a consumer you don’t want every service that comes along reinventing everything around the social fiber for example and as a company you don’t want to spend resources on work outside your value proposition.  Finding the balance between your unique perspective and value and simply adding all the stuff around your value is something to work through and be clear about.
  • No one wants that.  The focus group of one is both your biggest asset and biggest liability in building a product.  If you let one person, from your best friend to your spouse to your boss, convince you that no one wants a new product then too many ideas will fail to make it to fruition.  As the person taking the risk to seek funding or get approval for an idea, you owe it to yourself to keep pushing.  When the focus group of one is yourself and you’re taking the risk that is the very definition of entrepreneurial thinking.  You saw a problem, an opportunity, or a solution.  There’s always a time to take a step back but at the early stages a focus group of one that is yourself is pretty important.
  • Priced wrong.  All new technology products are going to be either too cheap or too expensive.  If you’re building a new device, it will always be too expensive in the early stages because the industry is, as we all know, based on economies of scale.  A new service or app is always going to struggle to simply charge people or find space for advertising from the start.  Too cheap/too expensive is going to happen.  Rather than just punt or just restate the known answers (from it will scale to freemium) perhaps you can differentiate your answer to these concerns with some novel or detailed thinking.
  • Doesn’t fit with strategy.  In a large organization you are, with 100% certainty, going to run up against “strategy” as you propose your new idea.  This can be a frustrating experience to a champion of a new idea (or new way to solve a problem).  You can throw up your hands in a huff.  You can claim “innovator’s dilemma”.  You can talk about stifling bureaucracy.  The important thing to do during this doubting moment is to be informed about these strategic issues.  These are real to a large company because a strategy is a unique part of what a large organization delivers to customers—it is more than a collection of products, but the relationship and between them and reasons they are offered.

5 ways to be over-confident

While many from the outside will be doubting you, the most important thing to do is overcome your natural reaction to dig your heels in and be stubborn.  When doubt is expressed it is your chance to engage in a dialog and to calmly evangelize your idea while hearing the doubt as feedback.  We all know that when you’re pushing a new idea there are things to do better.  This is especially true when you’re in the early stages and developing your “story” as to why the idea should get turned into a product.  What are some things you might be over-confident about that the doubters might actually be saying?

  • Wasn’t clear.  In talking about a potential new product the most common challenge is a problem between your brain and your mouth or keyboard :-)  In other words, as crystal clear as the ideas are in your head, when you say them or write them down it just seems like other people are not “getting it”.  Your own excitement and enthusiasm, or your own “ah ha” moment, isn’t getting translate into a pitch or description that others can grok.  After the third or fourth person saying they are confused or your conversations are “all over the map” then maybe you should take a step back and work on the description and story behind the idea?
  • Didn’t study the competition.  When folks say an idea isn’t new or has been done before, then it could be that you are not expressing the unique attributes of your idea in a compelling way or perhaps your unique attributes are not unique enough (or valued).  It could also be that you’re not expert enough on the competition.  Maybe in your excitement you missed a competitor or you dismissed a competitor too quickly?  Keep in mind the competition isn’t standing still so maybe things have changed from when you looked?
  • Design is weak.  Software products often get pitched before the design and flow of usage are understood.  For a product that is solving a known problem in a new way, the design is a critical element of what you’re offering.  In that case it really isn’t enough to pitch the idea as “don’t worry we’ll do a better design later” because your design is integral to the offering.  For any product that is entering a commodity space with a new twist on uniqueness (branding, distribution, pricing, bundling, etc.) the design of those elements (yes pricing can be designed) need to be more than sketches since those aspects are key to what you’re doing.  Without that level of detail you might be missing the crux of the doubt.
  • Trying to do too much.  “Boiling the ocean” is a common refrain when experienced people see an idea for a product that involves touching many known areas of existing products.  If you’re service starts off with the need to build out a whole infrastructure before you can even start to show your unique value or if you have a feature list a mile long, then there’s a good chance the doubt is not focused on your idea, but on the scope of what you’re trying to do.  Everyone loves big ideas, but rebuilding the world as the pre-requisite is a sign that you can do a better job scoping the first milestone or so of work.
  • Clinging to the wrong elements.  Many times in talking about an idea and in the early stages, every single choice you make is critical.  As the one originating the idea you tend to think of your product as a finely balanced set of decisions, each carefully interrelated.  As things progress, you owe it to yourself and doubters to make sure you are revisiting some choices.  Do you really need that architecture?  Is that UI widget really that important?  Is it critical that you have that feature?  In most every new product you can see something that you know was an early choice and doesn’t quite fit anymore.  Be the person leading the charge to back out of choices that are no longer key to delivering the value proposition.  You’re in a unique position to decide what can really go.

Keep in mind

From the moment you think up an idea until the first working models/prototypes are used by potential customers you’re going to run into doubts from all corners.  It is easy to lose confidence.  It is easy to become over-confident.  Balancing these two extremes is an important part of being brave enough to keep pushing forward.  New ideas can’t get turned into products without the skills to navigate this complex and emotional stage in product development.

Two things are always part of these early stages and important worth keeping in mind.

First, validation is hard to come by.  You will get tons of support and even encouragement from those around you.  But validation won’t come for a while.  Hang tight.

And second, product development is hard.  No one said building a new product or getting a big company to break into a new business (or redo an old business) is easy.  There are no right answers.  There’s no certainty.  Doubts come from shaking things up.

–Steven

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Written by Steven Sinofsky

February 27, 2013 at 7:00 am

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Rightsizing your product plan, but not your vision

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Creating a product, whether totally new or an update, means deciding what’s in and what’s out.  The main execution constraint you have is the time you are willing to spend developing your product (or the number of developers, roughly the same thing).  In your planning you need to decide the right amount of work to do to create, or justify, the product—rightsizing your product plan.  Executing a rightsized plan without compromising your vision is a core product development skill.

What is rightsizing?

While most all product development debates take place at a fairly granular level—having a specific feature, architecting an investment, choosing how to communicate the work—there are some broad topics that can have a profound impact on how the product evolves.  The most critical first step of a project is to decide the “scope”.  Deciding the scope of a project is an active conversation across all the stakeholders involved.

For software and service projects (note, project=product=service) the scope determines a whole host of choices, and even how you articulate the scope can open up or foreclose options.  You sort of need to start by checking in with the realities of your foundation:

Entirely new product.  An entirely new product is the opportunity to scope a product to a minimal set of features or needs.  In other words you can literally pick the smallest set of features/investments to express your scenario or goals.  It has become common to refer to this as a minimum viable product or MVP.  Another aspect of “new” is whether the project is new to your company/organization or new to the industry as a whole.  There’s a tendency to view scoping differently if something is entirely new to the world versus new to your organization.  An MVP can take on one meaning for a startup where there are no expectations for “minimal”.  For an existing company, this becomes increasingly challenging—things like globalization, accessibility, security, integration with existing account infrastructure, and more can set a significantly higher bar for “minimal”.

Evolving an existing product. Most all software is about evolving an existing product.  In scoping the work to improve an existing product the main dimensions that determine the scope will be compatibility with the current product—in user experience (keystroke, flow), data (file formats, previously saved work or settings), features (what a product does), or platform (APIs, add-ins).  In scoping a product plan for an existing product, deciding up front to maintain 100% of everything itself has a cost, which to the outside world or management, might be counter-intuitive.  Regression testing, design constraints, and even what you choose to do differently with existing features determine the scope of the new work for the release.  Sometimes a product can be new for the company even if it evolves an existing product, but these same constraints might apply from a competitive perspective.

Disrupting an existing product.  Any project can evolve for some period of time and eventually requires a significant overhaul—scenarios change, scale limits reached, user experience ages, and so on.  A project that begins knowing you will disrupt an existing product poses a different set of scoping challenges.  First and foremost you need to be clear on what part of the project you are disrupting.  For example, are you considering a full re-implementation of an existing product or are you re-architecting a portion of an existing product (again, say the UI, API, or features)?  Sometimes a product can be new to your organization but disrupt a competitive product, which brings with it a potentially different view of constraints.

Side-by-side product. One type of project scoping is to decide up front that your project will coexist with a product that solves a similar problem from your customers/company/organization.  This approach is quite typical for internal IT systems where a new system is brought up and run in parallel with the old system during a switchover period.  For a consumer product, side-by-side can be a shorthand for “keep doing it the way you’re doing it but try out our system” and that can apply to a specific set of customers you are targeting early in development.

Each of these is more granular and real-world in an attempt to cover more of the software projects so many of us work on.  Typically we look at projects as “new product” or “update” but tends to over-simplify the project’s scope.

Many projects get off to a rocky start if the team is not clear on this one question of scope.  Scoping a product is an engineering choice, not simply a way to position the product as it is introduced.  For example, you might develop the product as an evolution of a current product but fail to get some of the baseline work done.  Attempting to position the product as “totally new” or “just run it side by side” will probably backfire as many of the choices in the code do not reflect that notion–the seams will be readily apparent to customers (and reviewers). As with many challenges in product development, one can look back at the history of projects, both successful and not, and see some patterns to common challenges.

Pitfalls in scoping

Deciding and agreeing up front to the scope of your product is a critical first step.  It is also easy to see how contentious this can be and can often generate the visceral and stereotypical reactions from different parts of a collective team.

If you develop an enterprise product and propose something that breaks compatibility you can expect the scoping efforts to be met with an immediate “requirement” that compatibility be added back to the plan from your enterprise sales force, for example.

A consumer product in a space such as note taking or writing, as an example, can certainly be immediately overloaded with the basics of text processing and image handling.  Or one can expect reviewers to immediately compare it to the current most popular and mature product.  We’re all familiar with the first release of products that received critical reviews for missing some “must have core features” (like copy/paste) even though they had a broadly disruptive first release.

The needs for a product to be global, accessible, or to plug into existing authentication mechanisms are examples that take a great deal of up front work to consider and clarify with the team (and management).

In fact the first pitfall of most scoping efforts might be the idea that disagreements up front, or just different points of view that have been “shelved”, will be easily resolved later on.  One coping mechanism is for folks to think that the brilliance of the product’s innovation will be apparent to all parties and thus all the things “out of scope” will go from a disagreement to shared understanding once people see the product.  My experience is that this isn’t always how it works out :-)

The most difficult challenge when you’re scoping the project is that you actually considered all of these “obvious” things, yet as people see the product (or plans) for the first time these come across to them like obvious misses or oversights.  You probably know that you could add features that exist in the marketplace, that you’re breaking compatibility, that you’re going to need to run side-by-side, that you’re not ready for complex character sets, and so on.  Yet as the product is revealed to peers, management, reviewers, or even as the team sees the whole thing coming together there’s always a chance of a bit of panic will set in.  If you’ve gone through an effort to plan the scope, then none of this will be news and you will have also prepared yourself to continue forward progress and the discussion for how and why choices were made.

Even with that preparation, there are a few common pitfalls to project rightsizing that one needs to consider as a project goes from planning through execution.  These pitfalls can surface as the product comes together and the first customers see it or these can be the reason the product isn’t getting to a stage where others can see it:

  • Backing into a different scope.  The most critical failure of any project is to think you can revisit the scope of the project in the middle, and still stay on time.  If you decide to break compatibility with the existing product and build out new features assuming this approach then you’re faced with rearchitecting the new features, cutting them, or some decidedly tricky middle ground.  Taking a step back, what you’re really doing is revisiting the very approach of the whole product.  While this is possible, it is not possible to do so on the schedule and with the resources you have.
  • Too much.  Most all of us have scoped a project to do more than we can get done in the time and with the resources we have.  A robust product plan provides a great deal of flexibility to solve this if you were clear on the scope—in other words a feature list that is too long is easy to trim.  This is decidedly different than trying to change scope (change from disrupting the product to evolving the product for example).  If all you have is too many features, but the intent of the release is consistent with that long list—I promise there are features to cut.
  • Too little.  In the current climate where MVP is a perfectly good way to develop innovative new products, you can still scope the product to do too little.  In the new product space, this could be a sign that you have not yet zeroed in on the innovation or value-add of your product.  Similarly, any project that involves a data center deployment (or resources) and a commitment from partners can also be scoped such that the collective investment is more than the collective return on that investment.  In the evolution of existing products, such a release might be characterized as simply too conservative.  It could also lack focus and just be a little bit of stuff everywhere.
  • Wrong stuff.  Often overlooked as a potential pitfall of product scoping is a choice to solve the wrong problems.  In other words the plan might be solid and achievable, but the up-front efforts scoped the project on the wrong work.   This is simply picking wrong.  The trap you can fall into is how you cope with this—by simply adding more work or on-the-fly rescoping the product to do more or change scopes.  Wrong stuff is a common pitfall for evolving existing products—it is when the scoping efforts lacked a coherent view of priorities.
  • Local or global optimization.  Scoping a product is essentially an optimization function.  For an existing product that is evolving, there is a deliberate choice to pick an area and re-optimize it for a new generation.  For a new product, the MVP is a way of choosing a place in the value chain to optimize.  This scoping can be “off” and then the question is really whether the adapting that goes on during the project is optimizing the right plan or the wrong plan.  This optimization challenge is essentially a downstream reaction to having picked the wrong stuff.  You can A/B test or “re-position” the product, but that won’t help if you’re stuck on a part of the value curve that just isn’t all that valuable.  Is your optimizing truly about an optimal product or are caught in a trough optimizing something local that is not enough to change the product landscape?

Of course projects go wrong in so many ways, some major and some minor.  In fact, part of product development is just dealing with the inevitable problems.  Nothing goes smoothly.  And just like Apollo 13, when that first glitch happens you can think to yourself “gentlemen, looks like we had our glitch” or you can stay alert knowing that more are on the way.  That’s the nature of complex product development.

Approach to rightsizing

Rightsizing your project up front is a way to build in both constraints and flexibility.

Rightsizing is clarifying up front the bounding box of the project.  If you’re clear about the mechanical and strategic constraints of a project then you’ve taken the first step to keep things on track and to make sure your commitment to your team, customers, and management to develop a product can be met.  One way to think of these constraints is as the key variables for project scoping—you rightsize a project by choosing values for these variables up front.

Mechanical constraints are the pillars of a project from a project management perspective.  You can think of these as the budget or the foundation, the starting point:

  • People.  How many people are going to work on the project?  This is the simplest question and the easiest one to fix up front.  A good rule of thumb is that a project plan should be made based on the number of people you have from day one.  While many projects will add people over time, counting on them to do critical work (especially if the project is not one that lasts years) is almost certain to disappoint.  Plus most every project will have some changes in staffing due to natural people transitions, so the best case is to assume new people can fill in for departing folks.
  • Time. The next easiest scoping variable is how long your project will last.  Whether it is weeks, months, or years you have to pick up front. Proponents of continuously shipping still need to pick how long from the time code is planned and written until that particular code is released to customers in some way—and of course that can’t be done in isolation if multiple groups have code to release.  As with people, you can add more time but you don’t get proportionally more work.  And as we all know, once the project starts just making things shorter usually fails to meet expectations :-)  Many stakeholders will have a point of view on how long the project should last, but this cannot be viewed in isolation relative to what you can get done.
  • Code and tools.  For any project that is starting from an existing product, one should be deliberate about what code moves forward and what code will be replaced/re-architectected.  Starting from an existing product also determines a number of mechanical elements such as tools, languages, and cloud infrastructure.  For a new product, picking these up front is an important rightsizing effort and not the sort of choices you can revisit on the fly as often these impact not just the schedule but the expression of features (for example, native v. HTML5 app, or what infrastructure you connect to for authentication).  Choosing the code up front will bring in many stakeholders as it impacts the scope of the project relative to compatibility, for example.

While each of these mechanical attributes are relevant to the product strategy they don’t necessarily define the product strategy.  Commonly, products talk about release cadence as a strategy but in actuality that is an expression of the mechanical aspects of the project.  Strategic constraints are the walls of your project that build on the foundation of your mechanical constraints.  Your strategy is how you make choices about what to do or not do for the product.  There are a couple of key strategic constraints to address up front:

  • Big bets.  Every project makes a very small, or even just one, big bet.  For an existing product this might be a bet on a new user interface or new business model.  For a new product this might be the key IP or brand new scenario.  The big bet is the rallying cry for everyone on the team—it is the part everyone is going to sacrifice to make work.
  • Customer.  Every project needs to start off knowing who will be using the product.  Of course that sounds easy, but in a world of scoping a project it means that every potential customer cannot be served by a project to 100% of their needs or wants.  Knowing how you are delivering value to the relevant customers is a key rightsizing effort.  If you’re building on an existing product and breaking with the past or building a new product, then by definition some folks will not see the product as one that meets their needs.  It does not mean you will never meet their needs nor does it mean every customer like that will see things the same way.
  • Long term.  When rightsizing a project you want to know where you are heading.  There are many ways to do this—some very heavy and some very lightweight.  The context of your business determines how much effort to put into this work.  If you know where you are heading over time, not just one release, then you can connect the dots from what is missing today to where you will be after one or more turns of the crank.  A long term discussion is not the same as long term planning.  Long term planning is a heavyweight way of making commitments you probably can’t deliver on—we all know how much changes in every aspect of the team, market, business, etc.  But long term discussion allows everyone to get comfortable that “thinking” is happening.  One way to think of this tool is to make sure the dialog is what the team is thinking about, not what the team is doing, so that the long term dialog does not morph into long term commitments.

The first step in building a product plan is to scope the product—rightsizing.  It is common to fall into extremes of this step—being extremely minimal or being too broad.  In practice, the context of your business contributes to determining what viable alternatives to rightsizing are.  There are tools you can use to actively rightsize the project rather than to let the size of the project just sort of happen.  Rightsizing the current project with a longer term view as to where you are heading allows projects to be scoped without compromising your vision.  As with any aspect of product development, being prepared and knowing that these challenges are in front of you is the best way to manage them.

–Steven

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Written by Steven Sinofsky

February 19, 2013 at 6:00 am

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Focusing on the work, not the methodology

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Want to get developers fired up? Kick off a debate about development methodologies – waterfall, agile, lean, extreme, spiral, unified, etc.  At any given time it seems one method is the right one to use and the other methods, regardless of previous experience, are wrong.  Some talk about having a toolbox of methods to draw on.  Others say everyone must adapt to a new state of the art at each generation.  Is there a practical way to build good software without first having this debate?

There’s a short answer.  Do what feels right until it stops working for the team as a whole, and to do so without debating the issue to death, then iterate on your process in your context.  The clock is running all the time and so debating a meta-topic that lacks a right answer isn’t the best use of time.  There’s no right methodology any more than there is a right coding convention, right programming language, or right user interface design.  Context matters.

We’re all quick to talk about experimentation with code (or on customers) but really the best thing to do is make some quick choices about how to build the software you need and run with it.  Tune the methods when you have the project results in the context of your team and business to guide the changes.  Don’t spend a ton of time up front on the meta-debate about how to do the work you need to do, since all you’re doing is burning clock time.

Methods

Building a software product with more than a couple of people over anything longer than a few months requires some notion of how to coordinate, communicate, and decide.  When you’re working by yourself or on a small enough codebase you can just start typing and what happens is pretty much what you would expect to happen.

Add more people or more time (essentially the same thing) or both and a project quickly changes character.  The left hand does not know what the right hand is doing or more importantly when.  The front and back end are not lining up.  The user experience starts to lack a consistency and coherency.  Fundamentals such as performance, scale, security, privacy are implemented in an uneven fashion.  These are just a natural outcome of projects scaling.

Going as far back as the earliest software projects, practitioners of the art created more formal methods to specify and implement software and become more engineers.  Drawing from more mature engineering processes, these methods were greatly influenced by the physical nature of large scale engineering projects like building planes, bridges or the computers themselves.

As software evolved it became clear to many that the soft part of software engineering could potentially support a much looser approach to engineering.  This coincided with a desire for more software sooner.  Many are familiar with the thesis put forth by Marc Andreessen Why Software is Eating the World (if not, worth a read).  With such an incredible demand for software it is no surprise that many would like projects to get more done in less time and look to a methodological approach to doing so.  The opportunity for reward for building great software as part of a great business is better than ever.  The flexibility of software is a gift engineers in other disciplines would love to have, so there’s every reason to pivot software development around flexibility rather than rigidity.

Definitions

For this post let’s just narrow the focus to the ends of the spectrum we see in this dialog, though not necessarily in practice.  We’ll call the ends of the spectrum agile and waterfall.

In today’s context, waterfall methods are almost always frowned upon.   Waterfall implies slow, bureaucratic, micro-managed, incremental, removed from customers and markets, and more.  In essence, it feels like if you want to insult a product development effort then just label it with a waterfall approach.

Conversely, agile methods are almost always the positive way to start a project.  Agile implies fast, creative, energetic, disruptive, in-touch with customers and markets, and more.  In essence, if you want to praise a product development effort then just label it with an agile approach.

These are the stereotypical ends of a spectrum.  Anything structured and slow tilts towards waterfall and anything creative and fast tilts towards agile.  At each end there are those that espouse the specifics of how to implement a method.  These implementations include everything from the templates for documents, meeting agendas, roles and responsibilities, and often include specific software tools to support the workflow.

It is worth for a moment looking in a mirror and stereotyping the negative view of agile and the positive view of waterfall, just for completeness.  A waterfall project is thoughtful, architectural, planful, and proceeds from planning to execution to completion like a ballet.  On the other hand, agile projects can substitute chaos and activity for any form of progress—“we ship every week” even if it doesn’t move customers forward and might move them backwards.

Of course these extremes are not universally or necessarily true.  Even defining methodologies can turn into a time sink, so it is better to focus on reality of getting code written, tested, deployed/shipped and not debugging the process for doing so…prematurely.

Reality

In practice, no team maintains the character of the ends of this spectrum for very long, if ever.  There is no such thing as a pure waterfall project any more than there is a pure agile project.  In reality, projects have characteristics of both of these endpoints.  The larger or longer a project is the more it becomes a hybrid of both.  Embracing this reality is far better than focusing finite work energy on trying to be a pure expression of a methodology.

In discussions with a bunch of different folks recently I’ve been struck by the zeal at which people describe their projects and offer a contrast (often pointing to me  to talk about waterfall projects!).  One person’s A/B test is another person’s unfinished code in hands of customers.  One person’s architecture for the future is another’s slogging plan.  The challenge with the dialog is how it positions something everyone needs to do as a negative relative to the approach being taken.  Does anyone think you would release code without testing it with a sample of real people?  Does anyone really think that doing something quickly means you always have a poor architecture (or conversely that taking a long time ensures a good architecture)?

We all know the reality is much more subtle.  In fact, like so many product development challenges context is everything.  In the case of development methodologies the context has a number of important variables, for example some include:

  • Skills of team. Your team might be all seasoned and experienced people working in familiar territory.  You might be doing your n-th project together or this might be the n-th time building a similar project or update.  You know how hand-offs between team members work.  You know how to write code that doesn’t break the project.  Fundamentals such as scale, perf, quality are second nature.
  • Number of engineers / size of team.  The more people on a project the more deliberate you will likely need to be.  With a larger team you are going to spend time up front—measure twice, cut once.  The most expensive and time consuming way to build something in software is to keep rebuilding something—lots of motion, no progress. The size of the team is likely to influence the way the development process evolves.  On a larger team, more “tradition” or “convention” will likely be in place to begin with.  Questioning that is good, but also keeping in mind the context of the team is important.  It might feel like a lot of constraints are in place to a newcomer, especially relative to a smaller previous team.  The perspective of top, middle, bottom plays into this–it is likely tops and middles think there is never “enough” and bottoms think “too much”.  On a large team there is likely much less uniformity than any member of the team might think, and this diversity is an important part of large teams.
  • Certainty of project.  You might be working on a project that breaks new ground but in a way that is comfortable for everyone.  This type of product is new to the organization but not new to the industry (for example, a new online store for a company).  Projects like this have a higher degree of certainty about them than when building something new to the industry.
  • Size of code base.  Even with a small number of people, if you happen to have a large code base then you probably need to spend time understanding the implications of changes.  In an existing body of code, research has consistently shown about a 10% regression rate every time you make changes.  And keep in mind that “existing body of code” doesn’t have to mean decade’s old legacy code. It could just mean the brand new code the 5 of you wrote over the past six months but still need to work around.
  • Familiarity of domain.  The team might have a very high degree of familiarity with a domain.  In Dreaming in Code the team was very agile but struggling until they brought in some expertise to assist with the database portion of the project.  This person didn’t require the up-front planning one might think, because of the domain expertise they just dove right in building the require database.  But note, the project had a ton of challenges and so it isn’t clear this was the best plan as discussed in the book.
  • Scale services.  Scaling out an existing service or bringing up a new service for the first time is a big deal.  Whether you’re hosting it yourself or using a service platform, the methods you use to get to that first real world use might be different than those you would use for an app delivered through a store.  The interactions between users, security and privacy, reliability, and so on all have much different profiles when centralized.  Since most new offerings are a combination of apps and services, it is likely the methods will have some differences as well.
  • Realities of business.  Ultimately there is a business goal to a project.  It is easy to say “time to market is everything” and many projects often do.  But there is a balance to competitive dynamics (needing features) and quality goals (no one needs a buggy product) that really dictate what tolerances the marketplace will have for varying levels of quality and features one delivers.  Even the most basic assumption of “continuous updating” needs to be reconciled with business goals (something as straight forward as how to charge for updates to a paid app can have significant business implications for a new company).

The balance with all of these attributes is that they can all be used to justify any methodology.  If the team is junior then maybe more planning is in order.  If the project feels breakthrough then more agility is in order.  Yet as is common with social science, one can easily confuse correlation with causality.  The iPad is well-known to be almost a generation in the making (having started years before the iPhone then shelved).  Facebook is well-known to favor short cycles to get features into testing.  In neither case is it totally clear that one can claim the success of the overall effort is due to the methodology (causal v. correlation).  Rather what makes more sense is to say that within the context of those efforts the methodology is what works for the organization.

We don’t often read about the methodology for projects that do well but not spectacular.  We do read about projects that don’t do well and often we draw a causal relationship between that lack of success and the development methodology.  To me that isn’t quite right—products succeed or fail for a host of reasons.  When a product doesn’t do what the marketplace deems successful, the sequence of steps to build the product are probably pretty low down on the list of causal factors—quality, features, positioning, pricing, and more seem more important.

Many assert that you simply get more done using agile methods (or said another way, waterfall methods get less done) in a period of time, and given the social science nature of our work it is challenging to turn this assertion into a testable hypothesis.  We don’t build the same product twice (say the same way that carpenters know how to frame a house on schedule).  We can’t really measure “amount of work” especially when there can be so much under the hood in software that might not be visible or material for another year or two.

The reality of any project that goes to customers is that a certain amount of work needs to get done.  The methodology dictates the ordering of the work, but doesn’t change the amount of work.  The code needs to be written and tested.  The product needs to work at scale, reliable, secure, accessible, localizable, and more.  The user experience needs to meet the design goals for the product.  Over time the product needs to maintain compatibility relative to expectations—add-ins and customizations need to be maintained for example.

All of this needs to happen.  All of this requires elements of planning, iteration, prototyping, even trial and error.  It also requires a lot of engineering effort in terms of architecture and design.  On any project of scale, some elements of the project are managed with the work detailed up front.  Some elements are best iterated on during the course of the project.  And some can wait until the end where rapid change is not a costly endeavor.

There’s no magic to be had, unfortunately.  You can always do less work, but it doesn’t always take less time once the project starts.  You can’t do more work in less time, even if you add more resources. You can sacrifice quality, polish, details, and more and maybe save some time.  You can plan for a long time but it doesn’t change the amount of time to engineer or the value of real people using the product in real situations.  You can count of fixing things after the product is available to customers, but that doesn’t change the reality of never getting a second chance to make a first impression.  All of this is why product development is so fun—there simply aren’t magic answers.

There are ways to be deliberate in how you approach the challenge.

Checkpoints drive changes

Rather than advocate for a conversion of the whole team to a methodology or debate the best way to do the work, the best bet seems to always be much more organic.  On a small project, ask what would work for each of the team members and just do that.  On a large project, put some bounding principles in place and some supporting tools but manage by results not the process as best you can.

In all cases, the team should establish a rhythm of checkpoints that let everyone know where the project stands relative to goals.  Define a date along with criteria for the project at that date and then do an assessment.  This assessment is honest and transparent.  If things are working then great, just keep going.  If things are not working then that’s a good time to change.  The only failure point you can’t deal with on a project is a failure to be honest as a contributor and honest as a team.  If the dynamic on the team is such that it is better to gloss over or even hide the truth then no methodology will ever yield the results the team needs.

In projects I’ve worked on that have spanned from 3 months to 3 years, the only constants relative to methods are:

  1. Establish the goals of the project, the plan, in such a way that everyone knows the target—execute knowing where you want to end up and adapt when you’re not getting there or you want to adjust the target.
  2. Create a project schedule with milestones that have measureable criteria and honestly assess things relative to the criteria at each of those milestones.

The bigger the project the more structure you put on what is going on when, but ultimately on even the biggest projects one will find an incredible diversity of “methods”.  At least two patterns emerge consistently: (a) that scale services and core “kernel” efforts require much more up front planning relative to other parts of a project and failure to take that into account is extraordinarily difficult to fix later and (b) when done right, user experience implementation benefits enormously from late stage iteration.

Approach

Given all that is going on a project what’s the right way to approach tuning a methodology?

Very few software projects are on schedule from start to finish, and even defining “on schedule” can be a challenge.  Is a 10% error rate acceptable and does that count as on time?  If the product is great but was 25% late, time will probably forget how late it was.  If the product was not great but on time, few will remember being on time.

So more important than being on time is being under control.  What that means is not as much about hitting 4pm on June 17th, but knowing at any given time that you’re going to be on a predictable path to project completion.  Regardless of methodology, projects do reach a completion date—there’s an announcement and people start using what you built.  It might be that you’re ready to start fixing things right away but from a customer perspective that first new experience counts as “completing the project”.  Some say in the agile era products are never done or always changing.  I might suggest that whenever new codepaths are executed by customers the project as experienced some form of completion milestone (remember the engineers releasing the code are acting like they “finished” something).

The approach of defining a milestone and checkpoints against that milestone is the time to look at the methodology.  Every project, from the most extreme waterfall to the highest velocity agile project will need to adjust.  Methodologies should not constrain whether to adjust or not as all require some information upon which to base changes to the plan, changes to how people work, or changes to the team.

Checkpoints should be a lightweight self-assessment relative to the plan.  When the team talks about where they are the real question is not how are things going relative to a methodology but how things are going relative to the goal of the project.  The focus on metrics is about the code, not about the path to the code. Rather than a dialog about the process, the dialog is about how much code got done and how well is it working and connecting to the rest of the project.

That said there are a few tell-tale signs that the process is not working and could be the source of challenges:

  • Unpredictable.  Some efforts become unpredictable.  A team says they are going to be done on Friday and miss the date or the team says a feature is working but it isn’t.  Unpredictability is often a sign that the work is not fully understood—that the upfront planning was not adequate to begin the task.  What contributes to unpredictability is a two-steps forward, one-step back rhythm.  Almost always the answer to unpredictability is the need to slow down before speeding up.
  • Lots of foundation, not a lot of feature.  There’s an old adage that great programmers spend 90% of the time on 10% of the problem (I once interviewed a student who wrote a compiler in a semester project but spent 11 of 12 weeks on the lexical phase).  You can overplan the foundation of a project and fail to leave time for the whole point of the foundation.  The checkpoint is a great time to take a break and make sure that there is breadth not just depth progress.  The luxury of time can often yield more foundation than the project needs.
  • Partnerships not coming together.  In a project where two different teams are converging on a single goal, the checkpoint is the right time to sanity check their convergence.  Since everyone is over-booked you want to make sure that the changes happening on both sides of a partnership are being properly thought through and communicated.  It is easy for teams that are heads down to optimize locally and leave another team in a tough spot.
  • Unable to make changes.  In any project changes need to be made.  Surprisingly both ends of the methodology spectrum can make changes difficult.  Teams moving at a high velocity have a lot of balls in the air so every new change gets tougher to juggle.  Teams that have done a lot of up front work have challenges making changes without going through that process.  In any case, if changes need to be made the rigidity of a methodology should not be the obstacle.
  • Challenging user experience.  User interface is what most people see and judge a product by.  It is sometimes very difficult to separate out whether the UI is just not well done from a UI that does not fit well together.
  • Throwing out code.  If you find you’re throwing out a lot of code you probably want to step back—it might be good or it might be a sign that some better alignment is needed.  We’re all aware that the neat part of software is the rapid pace at which you can start, start over, iterate, and so on.  At some point this “activity” fails to yield “progress”.  If you find all or parts of your project are throwing out more code, particularly in the same part/area of a project then it is a good time to check the methodology.  Are the goals clear?  Is there enough knowledge of the outcome or constraints?
  • Missing the market. The biggest criticism of any “long” project schedule is the potential to miss the market.  You might be heads down executing when all of a sudden things change relative to the competition or a new product entry.  You can also be caught iterating rapidly in one direction and find competition in another.  The methodology used doesn’t prevent either case but a checkpoint offers you a chance to course correct.

It is common and maybe too easy to get into a debate about methodology at the start of a project or when challenges arise.  One approach to shy away from debates about characterizing how the work should be done is to just get some work done and iterate on the process based on observations about what is going wrong.  In other words, treat the development process much like the goal of learning how to improve the product in the market place through feedback.  A time to do this is at deliberate checkpoints in the evolution of the process.

So much of how a product evolves in development is based on the context—the people, the goals, the technologies—using that to your advantage by knowing there is not a high degree of precision can really help you to stay sane in the debates over methods.

This post was challenging to write. It is such a common discussion that comes up and people seem to be certain of both what needs to be done and what doesn’t work.  What are some experiences folks have had in implementing a methodology?  What are the signs you’ve experienced when regardless of the methodology the project is not going in the right direction? Any ideas for how to turn checkpoints into checking up on the project, not revisiting all the choices? (ok that last one is a favorite of mine and a topic for a future post).

–Steven

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Written by Steven Sinofsky

February 7, 2013 at 8:30 am

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Balancing tradeoffs across different customers

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Balancing the needs of different types of customers within a single product is an incredibly difficult challenge in product design.  Most every product faces this in the course of choosing features or implementation.  Designing products in a changing world with changing definitions of success can be a real challenge, but there are a number of creative approaches that can be used.

Tradeoffs across different customers

I was lucky enough this recently to spend some time with the CEO of a growing company (> 150 developers).  The company faces a constant struggle in their product line over how to balance the feature demands of end users “versus” IT professionals.  This is an especially acute challenge in a growing company where resources are limited and winning those early paying customers is critical.

The use of “versus” is intentional.  Most of the time we view these trade-offs as binary, either/or.  That’s the nature of the engineering view of a challenge like this.  In stark contrast, the sales/marketing view is often an “and” where the most desired end-state is to meet the needs of every type of customer.  In practice, the reality of what needs to be done and what can be done is much more subtle.

Because IT pro and end-users are often viewed as working against each other, this is natural  (By the way, I’ve never been a fan of the term user or end-user – a wise program manager I had the pleasure of working with once pointed out “only one other industry refers to customers as users, let’s not follow their lead.”)  IT Pros think end-users seem to exist to cause information leaks and network slow-downs. End-users, let’s just call them people or humans, think IT is there to prevent any work or progress from happening.  Again, reality is less extreme.

But we face many tradeoffs in developing feature lists, and thus product plans, all the time.  In fact for just about any software product/service these days you can easily list a variety of customer types:

  • Humans.  These are the broad set of people who will use your product.  Generally you don’t assume any extreme level product usage skills.  These are typical customers.  Of course all other customers are human too :-) The challenge each faces is representing their constituency and role beyond that of typical customer.
  • IT Pros.  For most tech products, IT Pros are the folks that deploy, purchase, or manage the product.  They might also provide infrastructure and hardware required to use a product or service. IT Pros also champion the people in the organizations they support.
  • Developers.  Developers contribute add-ins or consume APIs to develop customized solutions.  For many products, developers form a critical part of the ecosystem and often create the stickiness associated with a successful product.
  • Power users/enthusiasts.  These folks know the ins and outs of a product.  Often they teach others to use a product, staff the newsgroups or self-help forums, write blogs and articles about your product.  These are your fans.  Power users also have feature requests (demands!) for more control, more customization and so on.  Notice right away how this could work against IT Pros who want less of those or Humans who might be perplexed by such features.
  • Channel partners.  Many products are sold direct to humans or IT.  On the other hand there are a large number of products where there are intermediate partners who are required to sell, service, or otherwise transact with paying customers.  In an ad-supported product these are your advertisers.  This provides another tension point our industry commonly talks about—the aspects of ads in apps and web sites which are important to the channel but might not be valued as much by Humans, as an example.
  • Markets.  Many products aim to meet the needs of a global customer base.  Even in a global economy, there are major differences in features and scenarios around the world.

Not every product has every potential customer type and above is not a complete list.  Often there is overlap; for example, most IT Pros are often enthusiasts and/or power users.  The term “persona” often gets used to represent a customer type.  That is a good tool, but rather than focus on the details of the person, just defining a broad category is enough when planning and scoping the product.  The persona comes later in the process.

In industries defined by a combination of physical goods and physical distribution channels, products are segmented and offered with different attributes at different prices for different customers. Software and hardware products that intermix, or don’t distinguish between, both work and personal life, and often switch between those many times throughout a day, pose a special challenge to product designers (and marketers).  Working within this consumerization trend motivated this post.

Relative to designing for such a scenario, a product plan might find itself in a tough spot because of challenges in the plan or approach:

  • Focus nearly exclusively on one target customer type.  Sometimes the approach is to just draw a line in the sand and say “we’re all about end-users”.  Often this is the default most products take.  In some products you can see a clear view of who the target is and a clear strategy.  There are then “some features” aimed at appeasing other potential customer types.  You might rationalize this by combining customer types, by saying something like “Developers are just humans who can code” for example.
  • Do a little bit everywhere.  There might be a case where a product is not quite deliberate and the organization or up front resource allocations end up dictating how much each type of customer gets.  For example if you allocate a few developers to each segment then the let folks plan independently, the chances of features holding together well are reduced.  More likely, features might end up competing or conflicting as they are developed.
  • Have a plan (and some execution) and then realize late in the process you’re missing a customer.  We have talked about the need to bridge the engineering and marketing efforts.  In some plans there are engineering plans that don’t get buy off and as the product starts to come together the inevitable panic of “there are no features for X” where X is a customer type not receiving enough love.  Meetings. Panic. Last minute changes.  Doesn’t work.

The key to resolving tradeoffs is to know you’re making them up front.  Product development is inherently about tradeoffs in many dimensions—in fact product development can be viewed as a series of tradeoffs and the choices made relative to those tradeoffs.

Planning to make choices

A recurring theme with this blog will be to surface issues while you are planning and to acknowledge up front that the plan is going to make choices about what to do.  Rather than think of this as a micro-management waterfall approach, the team needs to arrive at principles that guide decision making every day for the team.  Principles and plans work better than budgets, organizations, or requirements—principles are what smart and creative people can use effectively as a tool to address the tradeoffs inherent in product development.  Tools like budgets and requirements are more like weapons people can use against other parts of the team to prevent work from happening.  Principles tell the team the starting point and the end point and offer guidelines for how to make choices as the path to the end point is developed.

As an example, consider a budget that you establish that says how many resources will go to Humans and how many will go to IT Pros.  Sounds great on paper.  It seems like the easy way up front to decide how to address the conflict or tension.

This can backfire because it is not a holistic plan for what the product will be.  In fact is almost prevents the holistic plan from happening because the first choice you make is to partition resources.  The leaders of those resources are then incented to just make a plan for their efforts rather than think about the whole of the project.  That isn’t evil or malicious, just a natural outcome of resource allocation and accountability.

This same dynamic might occur if you partition the team into front end/back end, or UI/service for example.  Such a structure is fine, but should be done in the context of a holistic plan.  Putting in place such a structure before there is a plan and hoping the plan resolves difficult problems can be difficult.

Conflict and tension are actually created by a resource budgeting approach as people naturally defer choices and decision to the management and resource allocation tools, not a collaborative product plan.

Approach

Building on the previous post about developing a framework, one can use these same tools as a way of cross-checking the plan against customer types.

We talked about a tool where you identify feature ideas and assign costs as a way to arrive at a holistic view of the product.  This tool can be used with different folks in the org or even customers/partners.

Once you have arrived at a list you can take this a step further.  A good idea is to refine the list of proposed ideas with your own knowledge of feature descriptions and granularity.  What is helpful at this point is to develop a catalog of features that you feel could be effectively communicated to customers broadly.

For example for a very large product these would be the sessions you might give at a customer workshop describing the product.  For a first generation product these features would be the product information page on a web site or even the table of contents of the product overview document you might give to a member of the press.

The way to gain an understanding of the tradeoffs you are making relative to customer types is to take the features and align them with the different customer types you have identified.  This can easily be done by a spreadsheet or even a list on a whiteboard.

When you’re done every feature is listed once – you don’t give yourself credit in more than one place for a feature.  This forces you to really decide who values a feature the most.  Features will naturally fall into place.  For example, management features will fall to IT Pros or ease of use to end-users.

Most products will show the inherent “tilt” towards a customer type during this phase.  You then step back as a team and ask yourself if you’ve made the right tradeoffs or not.

Then iterate and make sure you are really delivering the holistic plan.  Once you get closer to a holistic plan you can allocate resources.  Iteration doesn’t stop there of course.  You can move forward with a more refined view of the plan and the resources. Implementation then progresses based on the resources at hand, which is better than ideation and planning based on resources.  Unlike a characteristic waterfall approach, a good planning process is a process of iteration, convergence, and parallel efforts across disciplines.

Design tradeoffs

The above all sounds good, probably.  If you do the above you can solve the resource allocation and overall scope of the product relative to different types of customers.  It doesn’t, however, get to the heart of one really hard problem.  What to do when customer needs conflict?

One thing to do is bury your head in the sand and just say there is no conflict.  That is saying, for example, that end-users will value features missing that IT removed or that IT will just get over themselves and not mind arbitrary extensions being loaded on the device.  That doesn’t work of course.

Because product development does not end—a release is just a point in time, which is even more so on today’s continuous product cycles—you do need to get comfortable not doing everything for everyone every release.  There is always a next release.  So resolving design tradeoffs needs to be about having a set of principles and a product architecture that you can build on.

This is where understanding where your own product is going is crucial, a longer term strategic view.  Most products when they are new receive a combination of praise and criticism from power users, as one example.  If the scenario or problem solved is compelling, power users will praise the product.  They are, generally, quick to offer up suggestions and feedback for how to add flexibility or more features.  That’s exciting.

In the process of designing the product, a key responsibility for the designer is to know where a design is heading.  How will you know how to add more power and control?  If you don’t have ideas while designing the product in the first place you might be designing yourself into a hole.  Famously, copy/paste were missing from smartphones when first released.  Even with a new touch design language, designers clearly understood where this would go.  That was important and made it easy to introduce without a major shift in the overall ease of use that was the hallmark of the design.  This could have easily been a conflict between power and ease of use.

Code architecture or architectural approaches play a key part in how you think about where you are today relative to where you are going.  Many of the architectural differences between the different OS platforms we see today compared to how an OS looked 10 years ago result from making tradeoffs in the architecture.  App stores, sandboxing, APIs with brokers are all about tilting the architecture towards security, battery life, and end-user safety.

We look at these changes in architecture today and compare them to where we came from and can easily see the difference.  But think about the debates and planning that took place—this was a big change in approach.  It was not easy for those making platforms to make these architectural tradeoffs in such a new way.  Creatively addressing new requirements is a key part of understanding your product evolution over time.

An important tool is having a set of product principles–design language, architectural framework, and customer value proposition.  These principles not only guide the development team but make it easy to articulate the tradeoffs made to customers when you’re done.  That doesn’t make the dialog easy or even get folks to agree with the choices you make.  But you’re having a conversation informed by what your product is trying to do.

An amazing change in happening in our industry today with “BYOD” or bring your own devices to work.  This is a whole new level of design tradeoff the industry is facing.  Since the late 1990’s the focus on administration has been to “lock down” or “control” computing devices.  That worked well given the choices and challenges faced.

Consumers now can bring their own devices to work, work from home, or find ways of doing work outside the scope of the corporate network/software/device.  This doesn’t change the security, IP, and safety needs of a corporation or government agency.  It does change the decision framework of IT.  Their internal clients have choices and how those choices overlay with the design tradeoffs in products is very interesting.

Just as APIs and OS capabilities are changing, and perhaps resetting expectations of some customer types, the way devices and software are managed are changing architecturally.  As you’re planning the product, developing an architectural approach that plays out in a forward looking way is going to be a key part of resolving the design tradeoffs.

This is the engineer part of resolving tradeoffs—sometimes it is not just coming up with features, but new architectural approaches can put you on a new trajectory.  That new trajectory defines new ways to design products for many types of customers.

The only thing you know for sure in addressing customer tradeoffs is that there is no right answer that always pleases all customers.  That’s the nature of appealing to multiple customer types.  That’s why product development is also a social science.

An Example: the enterprise challenge

These days, one of the most challenging product design debates centers on how one balances the needs of enterprise IT and the community of people, humans, using products within an enterprise.  There is a major shift going on in our industry with the wave of consumer products able to fulfill scenarios outside of the control IT.

The dramatic change is decidedly not in the enterprise need to secure the digital assets of an organization or to maintain the integrity of corporate networks or to even manage the overall usage of corporate resources (balancing work and non-work).  These requirements are not only still there, but in a world where a single leak of customer or financial data can make international news or the interest of regulatory bodies these requirements are more intense than ever.

The dramatic change, however, is in the ability for people within an enterprise to easily acquire tools to accomplish the work they need.  In another era, obtaining servers, licensing software, getting it on site and running were all tasks that required IT sponsorship and often resources.  Today tools such as cloud storage, peer to peer communications, CRM, or even commerce are just a few clicks away and require nothing more than a corporate credit card, if that.

The only policing mechanism that can be deployed “against” these tools is a policy approach.  While one can block TCP/IP ports or suspicious network traffic (and certainly block downloaded client code on managed PCs), even this is challenging.  Network access itself is easily obtained via a WiFi/4G access point or phone as hotspot.

The traditional approaches of locking down a device simply don’t work.  In a world of mobile devices and perhaps even multiple operating systems, there isn’t a clear focal point for these lock down efforts and certainly not even a single implementation that is possible.

Where some might see this as freedom, others might see this as chaos.  Smart product design efforts see an opportunity.  There’s an opportunity to design products that embrace this challenge and opt to provide an architecture for IT to get done what is required of them and at the same time making it easy for people to discover and spread tools to other coworkers that solve the business challenges they face.

The design challenge is about defining a new architecture that takes into account the reality that you can design yourself into a corner if you go too far in either direction.  You can focus too much on empowering people and face either a policy choice from IT or worse an active campaign against your product from the enterprise analyst community.  You can focus too much on IT and your product might enable IT to turn a cool product into a locked down or customized experience that drives end-users to your competition, which is only a click away.

This is where design principles can come into play.  What is the current implementation of management—what has been implemented by IT organizations that has might have lowered the satisfaction of corporate computing relative to home computing or BYOD, for example?  Efforts like excessive logon scripts or complex network access requirements that keep people from using the network and favoring the path of least resistance, perhaps?  Or perhaps a customized user experience for a product that is also used on home PCs and thus “different” at home and work, driving more use of the home PC for work?

Given an environment like that what is an architecture that takes into account the downsides of existing approaches to enterprise management and creates a more favorable experience while maintaining security, knowing that options abound?

Can a device be managed without changing the user experience?  Can a software product be locked down relative to critical functions to reduce support calls without IT getting between the work that needs to be done and the employee?

These are the sorts of questions one needs to raise in reconciling the apparently contradictory needs of IT and people using modern products and services.

Really diving into these as you design your product has the potential to develop a real competitive advantage for your product and service.

–Steven

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Written by Steven Sinofsky

January 28, 2013 at 7:00 am

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